Literary Easter Eggs – 2014 Edition


easter_eggs1_2.JPG by pentacs  | morgueFile

easter_eggs1_2.JPG by pentacs | morgueFile

In 2013, I celebrated Holy Week with An Easter Egg Hunt. Here, I referenced Wikipedia’s definition of an Easter Egg – a hidden message in a work which refers to something else. This can be an inside joke or a friend’s name. Also in 2013, Candice of warmcuppatea posted twice on this topic - Literary Easter Eggs – Stephen King Edition and Literary LOST Easter Eggs – Part II. By the way, when I Googled “Literary Easter Eggs,” her Stephen King Edition post came up on the first page of results. Props to you, Candice! ;)
This Easter, I’m sharing some books that have Easter Eggs. These might be references to other works or might have namesake characters. As was true with the books I shared on Valentine’s Day,  you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! :)
      

 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy  The Peach Keeper (Center Point Platinum Romance (Large Print))  The Da Vinci Code Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Bantam Classics) Nine Dragons (A Harry Bosch Novel) The Truth About Forever

 The Virgin Suicides: A Novel  The French Lieutenant's Woman  Trial by Fury (J. P. Beaumont Novel)  Apollyon: The Destroyer Is Unleashed (Left Behind)  11/22/63: A Novel  1022 Evergreen Place (Cedar Cove) 

 Pegasus in Flight (Talent, Bk. 2)  Atonement: A Novel  Nineteen Minutes  Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems  Atlas Shrugged  Charlotte's Web (Trophy Newbery)

Ruta Sepetys’ Out of the Easy


Out of The Easy

Jorie’s Store – Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys

Title and Author(s):  Ruta Sepetys’ Out of the Easy

Release Date: February 12, 2013
Publisher: Philomel; First Edition edition

ISBN: 978-0399256929
Pages: 352
Source: Harris County Public Library 

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Reasons for Reading: After reading Ruta Sepetys’ Between Shades of Gray (not to be confused with the infamous E.L. James trilogy), I wanted to read Sepetys’ sophomore effort. Additionally, the setting of New Orleans appealed to me. I placed a request on it and excitedly received the book in 2014.

Summary: In 1950, seventeen year old Josie Moraine barely makes ends meet working in the French Quarter. Her erratic, somewhat estranged mother works as a prostitute. Josie longs to make her way out of New Orleans and to the Ivy Leagues. Around New Year’s Day, a wealthy man from Tennessee turns up dead. When the crime seems to lead to Josie’s mother and her shady boyfriend, Josie finds herself embroiled.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I hadn’t realized Tulane had a sister college – Newcomb.

What I Liked: The fantastic setting of New Orleans appealed to me again. Sepetys’ also diverged greatly from that of Between Shades of Gray. Nonetheless, the characters and situations described still made me want to know what would happen to them as they did in Sepetys’ first novel.

What I Disliked: I wasn’t happy with Josie’s mother being a sociopath sort of whore. Also, I thought there were too many evildoers in this book.

RR - Orange

Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 


Song: 
Shirley and Lee – Let the Good Times Roll

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St Augustine’s Confessions (Revisited Challenge)


Confessions (Oxford World's Classics)Title and Author(s):  Saint Augustine Confessions
Release Date: February 15, 2009
ISBN: 978-0199537822
Pages: 311
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Source: (Barnes & Noble Classics) 

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Reasons for Reading:  My first time with Augustine of Hippo happened in one of freshman courses at Baylor. While not exactly resonating with me, I sensed the impact of a work from the father of theologians. Along with The Prince, Augustine’s Confessions won in the Revisited Challenge. While the cover to the right comes from Jorie’s Store on Amazon, I downloaded a copy to my Nook.

Summary: Considered one of the earliest autobiographies, Augustine of Hippo penned these confessions of his youth. He tells of a sinful youth in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries A.D. in Northern Africa. As Augustine was in his early forties when writing Confessions, these don’t tell his entire life story. Still, he sheds insight into his life before conversion to Christianity. Augustine regrets his indiscretions prior to his Christian life. A classic example would be stealing pears.

While his father is a pagan, his mother, Monica, is a Christian. In Augustine’s early years, Monica prays for her son’s salvation. She goes as far as to ask God to send someone to intervene. God places St. Ambrose in Augustine’s path.

When Augustine accepts Christ, he goes on to become the Father of Theology. He influences people to this day. Also, he shows how Christians are not perfect but those who have accepted forgiveness and salvation offered by Jesus Christ.

One Thing I Learned from this book: His mother is now known as Saint Monica. She is the patron saint of difficult marriages, disappointing children, victims of adultery or unfaithfulness, victims of (verbal) abuse, and conversion of relatives. One of her namesakes is Santa Monica, California.

What I Liked: Augustine’s writing style is straightforward and easy to follow. An easy outline helps readers comprehend his life story, Monica’s fervent hopes, and Augustine’s general call to action. He truly leads by example.

What I Disliked: I think Augustine does need to give himself a break. None of us are perfect. Besides, guilt does nobody any good.

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

Song: Friar Alessandro – Adeste Fideles

You might also like:

  • Philip Brooks’ Hannibal: Romes Worst Nightmare (Wicked History)
  • Virgil’s The Aeneid 
  • Gloria Fiero’s The Humanistic Tradition

For more, check out the following sites:

What Are You Reading? – March 2014 Edition


What Are You Reading?
This is the continuation of monthly feature and it’s formal name is Jorie’s Reads by Starry Night Elf asks “What Are You Reading?” This month, Jorie’s Reads heard more from the Freeman Library Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Club.   If you’re interested in participating in a future “What Are You Reading?” post, please comment on this post.
You can visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon by clicking on the following book covers. Shopping at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways!
           Fiction:

The Secret of Magic  River Road  The Invention of Wings: A Novel  The Dark Unwinding

Darkship Thieves (Baen Science Fiction)    Alas, Babylon   The Martian: A Novel  Quozl

Elantris  The Age of Miracles: A Novel    

Nonfiction:

 Nerd Do Well   Going Beyond Google Again: Strategies for Using and Teaching the Invisible Web  Tomas de Torquemada: Architect of Torture During the Spanish Inquisition (Wicked History)

Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince (Revisited Challenge)


The Prince (Dover Thrift Editions) By Niccolò Machiavelli, N. H. Thompson | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince
Release Date: September 21, 1992
ISBN: 978-0486272740
Pages: 80
Publisher: Dover Publications; Reprint edition
Source: (Barnes & Noble Classics) 

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Reasons for Reading:  I first read Machiavelli as a high school World History student. I read The Prince again in college, struck by writers’ love and devotion to the city-state of Florence. As one of the winners in the Revisited Challenge, I downloaded a copy to my Nook.

Summary: Machiavelli wrote The Prince as a how-to guide to ruling. He wrote these instructions for Lorenzo de’ Medici, the Florentine ruler of Machiavelli’s day. Machiavelli began writing it in 1513 and finished it a year later. However, The Prince was not published until after Machiavelli’s death in 1532. Within his instruction guide, Machiavelli advised de’ Medici to promote his own interests, cover his backside, and create a stable government. In his estimation, Machiavelli pursues an argument purely based on logos; negating the need for ethos or pathos.

When Machiavelli wrote The Prince, Florence faced much political upheaval. While Machiavelli wanted de’ Medici to remain on the throne, this prince did not heed Machiavelli’s advice. In 1559, the pope included The Prince on his Index of Prohibited Books.”

One Thing I Learned from this book: While not mentioned in this treatise, Lorenzo de’ Medici was the father of the infamous Catherine de’ Medici. He passed on when she Catherine was twenty-one days old. I wonder how she would’ve taken Machiavelli’s instruction.

What I Liked: His straightforward prose leave little to the imagination. I haven’t felt a need to read commentaries to elucidate Machiavelli’s meaning(s) in his work. Also, I appreciate his sense of patriotism, love, and devotion to Florence.

What I Disliked: I found his lack of credence to ethos and pathos unrealistic. It’s the same as a rude person saying “I just tell the truth. It’s your problem that you’re sensitive.”

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

Song: Carmina Burana ~ O Fortuna | Carl Orff ~ André Rieu

You might also like:

  • Voltaire’s Candide
  • Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan 
  • Karl Marx’s The Communist Manifesto 
  • John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty 
  • John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government 

For more, check out the following sites:

Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Revisited Challenge)


Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories By Truman Capote | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Truman Capote’s
Release Date: 1958

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 978-0679745655
Hours: 160
Source: Harris County Public Library 

* 1001 Books Book

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Reasons for Reading: Initially, I listened to this novella on audiotape. I enjoyed how more than one actor read different parts in the story. However, I considered Elizabeth Ashley of “Evening Shade” fame an odd selection for the voice of Holly Golightly. Nevertheless, I never reviewed this Truman Capote classic. When Breakfast at Tiffany’s won in the Revisited Challenge, I read a printed version.

Summary: An unnamed narrator befriends his enchanting neighbor, Holly Golightly, in the autumn of 1943. Holly insists on referring to the narrator as “Fred” because he reminds her of her older brother. “Fred” and Holly live in apartments in the same brownstone which is located in Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Holly is only a eighteen or nineteen year old girl from the country. Yet, she’s turned into a cosmopolitan darling of cafe society. Holly holds no job and maintains her lifestyle by socializing with wealthy men. These men take her out on the town and shower her with money and expensive gifts. Author Capote called Holly an American geisha.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I saw the film before I read the book. I was surprised that the events of the book took place in 1943-44.

What I Liked: I liked the narrator’s tone throughout the novella. As a reader, I felt his warmth and affection, especially towards Holly Golightly.

What I Disliked: Yet, I wasn’t quite comfortable with this American geisha lifestyle.

RR - Orange  Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 


Song: 
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (3/9) Movie CLIP – Moon River (1961) 

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For more, check out the following sites:

What Are You Reading? – February 2014 Edition


What Are You Reading?
This is the continuation of monthly feature and it’s formal name is Jorie’s Reads by Starry Night Elf asks “What Are You Reading?” In February 2014, Jorie’s Reads heard from the Freeman Library Science Fiction/Fantasy Book Club.  Also, a few bookish friends responded to the January Edition. If you’re interested in participating in a future “What Are You Reading?” post, please comment on this post.
You can visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon by clicking on the following book covers. Shopping at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways!
           Fiction:

Poison  SEAL Team 666: A Novel  Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas  A Dance of Cloaks (Shadowdance)

The Valley of Amazement  Little Women (Bantam Classics)  Shift - Omnibus Edition (Silo Saga) (Volume 2)   The Warded Man: Book One of The Demon Cycle

Elantris  Giant Thief  Influx  A Lady Cyclist's Guide to Kashgar: A Novel

Nonfiction:

 Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder   The First 90 Days: Critical Success Strategies for New Leaders at All Levels  English Standard Version Bible with Apocrypha

President’s Day 2014


Lincoln Memorial

Since President’s Day seems to be an excellent time to shop, please browse Jorie’s Store on Amazon :P … Seriously, I’m blessed that I live in a land where we elect our officials.
      

 

         

Books I Love – 2014


This Valentine’s Day, I’m sharing some of the books I loved reading. By clicking on the covers, you can visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon by clicking on the following book covers. Shopping at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! <3 :)
      

A Cafecito Story: El Cuento Del Cafecito  Rainwater by Sandra Brown   Middlesex: A Novel (Oprah's Book Club)

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane  The Namesake: A Novel  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (P.S.)

 The Little Prince 70th Anniversary Gift Set (Book/CD/Downloadable Audio)  Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Persephone Classics)  The Shack    

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Revisited Challenge)


Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave 
Release Date: 08/01/2005
ISBN: 9781593080419
Pages: 160
Source: (Barnes & Noble Classics) 

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Reasons for Reading: I first read Frederick Douglass’ autobiography as a college student. As one of the winners in the Revisited Challenge, I bought a copy at my local Barnes & Noble.

Summary: Originally published in 1845, Douglass recalls the abuse and deprivation he suffered as a slave in Maryland. Douglass also reveals how he was inadvertently encouraged to read and write. The combination of these elements brought forth a strong, determined individual who lent a hand into reshaping his world.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Maryland was rather Southern in Antebellum USA.

What I Liked: I could easily see and comprehend Douglass’ plight. Also, I knew this work was an autobiography so I had some idea that things would end better for Douglass.

What I Disliked: I hated that anyone had to endure such tragedy.

RR - Orange  Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 

Song: Morehouse College – We Shall Overcome

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For more, check out the following sites: