Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice


*1001 Books Book

Austen, J., & Gibson, F. (2000). Pride and prejudice. Recorded Books classics library. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books. 9780788749148

I was on one of my bursts of wanting to read more of the 1001 Books list when I saw Austen’s Pride and Prejudice among the audiobooks shelf at one of the HCPL branches. Since so many of my friends and colleagues raved about this book and I enjoyed Bride and Prejudice, I finally listened to Austen’s great novel of manners.

In early nineteenth century England, the Bennet family faces the daunting consequences of fee tail. Mr. Bennet has five daughters (lovely Jane, clever Elizabeth, plain Mary, silly Kitty, and frivolous Lydia) and no sons. None of the Bennet women can inherit from Mr. Bennet; his estate will go to his closest male relative. Compounding the issue is his vacuous wife, Mrs. Bennet, who singlemindedly wants her daughters to marry well. 

When wealthy bachelor Mr. Bingley rents a nearby estate, he and Jane quickly like each other. Of course, it takes they don’t realize that the feeling’s mutual. It doesn’t help that Bingley has ornery friend Mr. Darcy advising him against pursuing Jane. On top of that, Darcy is the coldest, most prideful person Elizabeth has ever encountered. . . or so it seems.

This work, like many of Austen’s others, formed the definition of the modern novel. Excellent characterization, plot development, dialogue, and slice of life all can be found within the covers of Pride and Prejudice. These characters are so familiar that we can see them in our contemporary lives.

Four Out of Five Pearls.

Places: Great Britain

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