The Book of Joshua


Joshue, the first book of the Bible I completed in the Bible-Reading Challenge 2011

* Bible Log – 2011 « Jorie’s Reads

Joshua – NIV archaeological study Bible: An Illustrated walk through Biblical history and culture. (2005). Grand Rapids, Mich: Zondervan. 9780310938521.

This is my second year to attempt the Read through the Bible. Creator Michael Coley has a daily Bible reading plan outlined, helping participants to read in a year’s time. Throughout the week, I’ve been reading seven different parts of the Bible. Tuesday nights are for reading the Histories. Joshua was the first book I’ve finished in this challenge as well as a History. This year, I have resolved to do all this Bible reading in my Archeological Study Bible. This particular version possesses great side/margin articles, outlines, and beautiful pictures from the places.

An Old Testament book, Joshua is the first book of the Nevi’im, the second part of the Jewish canon. After Moses dies, his appointed successor, Joshua, son of Nun, is commanded by God to lead the Hebrews across the Jordan River. With Joshua, God holds up His end of the covenant with the Hebrews, regaining the Promised Land. The first twelve chapters, Part I, focus on Joshua’s heroic leadership of God’s people and the restoration of Canaan. Of course, this is when walls of Jericho come tumbling down as the song goes. Part II, (Chapter 13 – 22) focuses on the division of the land amongst the tribes of Israel. The Conclusion, Part III, holds Joshua’s farewell address, the covenant at Shechem, and the deaths of Joshua and Eleazer, a Levite priest and nephew of Moses. Throughout the book, Joshua’s devotion to God radiates from the pages. Oh, and God never fails!

Yes, I found some Joshua tedious, especially the division and distribution of Israel. However, the first part is pure marvel to me. One of the margin notes addresses Rahab’s the Prostitute’s house and it’s placement. It even contains one of my favorite passages

Be strong and courageous, because you will lead these people to inherit the land I swore to their ancestors to give them.7 “Be strong and very courageous. Be careful to obey all the law my servant Moses gave you; do not turn from it to the right or to the left, that you may be successful wherever you go. 8 Keep this Book of the Law always on your lips; meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it. Then you will be prosperous and successful. 9 Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the LORD your God will be with you wherever you go.” (1:6-9)

I’m proud I’ve gotten this far and please wish me well in this endeavor. Did I mention that this was my sole new year’s resolution?

For more on Joshua and Bible-Reading Challenge, check out the following links:

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Top Ten Book to Movie adaptations | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

 

1) The Virgin Suicides (Jeffrey Eugenides/ Sofia Coppola) – Except for a slight change at the end and leaving out a few characters, Sofia Coppola was faithful to the book. The casting was spot on and the soundtrack was sublime.

2) Sense and Sensibility (Jane Austen/ Ang Lee) – I saw this movie, the one with Emma Thompson in it, before I read the book. The film was so good that I decided to read the book.

3) About a Boy (Nick Hornby/ Chris Weitz) – This movie is one of my all-time favorites. I read the book afterwards and understood, even appreciated the updates on the book. Hornby provided terrific character study and Hugh Grant nailed the role of Will. The boy was good, too.

4) The Graduate (Charles Webb/ Mike Nichols) – I just finished the book. Hoffman, Bancroft, and Ross were superb in the roles. Since I like Simon and Garfunkel, I like The Graduate.

5) Rising Sun (Michael Crichton/ Philip Kaufman) – Wesley Snipes plays a white character and he plays him well. My favorite actor in the cast was Tia Carrerre.

6) The French Lieutenant’s Woman (John Fowles/ Karel Reisz) – The book and the movie were odd. In efforts to provide the contemporary feel of Victorian events, the movie was about both the actors playing Smithson and Sarah in the 1980s.

7) The Rainmaker (John Grisham/ Francis Ford Coppola) – Matt Damon is a great actor, especially when it comes to playing characters out of books. This movie proved it to me. While I was convinced by The Talented Mr. Ripley, this movie adaptation was much better. Also, I liked Rudy Baylor much better than Tom Ripley. Claire Danes was good, too, in The Rainmaker.

8 ) The Godfather (Mario Puzo/ Francis Ford Coppola) – The Coppolas are faring well on my list! The characters are dynamic, Pacino and Keaton were perfectly suited to play Michael and Kay. There were changes in the movies but these received Puzo’s blessing.

9 ) To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee/ Robert Mulligan) – This is requisite.

10) The Green Mile (Stephen King/ Frank Darabont) – I was divided between this one and The Dead Zone. Ultimately, the actors – Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan beat out Christopher Walken.

Top Ten Favorite Love Stories In Books | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

NEXT WEEK THE TOPIC IS: Top Ten Book to Movie adaptations (for those movies that actually didn’t butcher the book!) See a list of future TTT here.

However, this week’s challenge is Top Ten Favorite Love Stories in Books. So, here goes . . .

  1. Tristan by Gottfried von Strassburg: The honorable Cornish knight Tristan follows orders of his uncle, King Mark, to escort his uncle’s comely bride, the Princess Isolde. Isolde possesses a magic love potion which she and her betrothed are to share. However, Isolde and Tristan have the drink.
  2. Katherine by Anya Seton: This historical fiction novel features the story of the remarkable Katherine Swynford. This real person caught the attention of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. While they didn’t marry until close to the end of their lives, this story resonates to this days.
  3. Othello by William Shakespeare: I made myself only select one Shakespeare play. Othello the Moor marries the fair Desdemona. Desdemona chooses Othello over the foppish men of Venetian childhood and loves Othello eternally. However, the evil Iago turns Othello into the green-eyed monster.
  4. “Sonnets from the Portuguese” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning: the sickly and hermetic Elizabeth believes herself to be dying. However, her fortune takes a turn for the better with the young, dashing Robert Browning.
  5. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough: It’s a little seamy but still deserves mention. Meggie falls in love with Ralph de Briccasart, the Roman Catholic priest.
  6. The Divine Comedy by Dante: Forget Francesca and Paola, I’m talking about Dante the Pilgrim and his ladylove, Beatrice. He admired her so much that in his writing, Beatrice guides him through Heaven.
  7. Atonement by Ian McEwan: Dilettante Cecilia Tallis and overachieving Robbie Turner unite in a pivotal way, changing the two permanently. When Robbie loses favor, Cecelia remains at his side.
  8. Beauty and the Beast by  Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve:  This story strikes similar chords to that of King Lear. The youngest daughter, Belle, is the truest beauty. She stays at the Beast’s Castle to make up for what her father did. When she sees this brute suffering, she cries over him.
  9. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand: Even though I absolutely abhor the sexual violence (rape even) and Rand’s masogyny, this is a remarkable story of love.  Roark and Dominique bring out the best in one another and have a happier end than most.
  10. The Stephanie Plum Series by Janet Evanovich: This is probably my favorite love triangle in literature. Stephanie Plum’s attention is coveted by Joe Moretti and Ranger. These days, I root for Ranger.

Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex


Eugenides, J. (2002). Middlesex. New York: Picador. 9780312422158

I actually read this book in Summer 2007 whilst between semesters in grad school. It was Oprah’s pick at the time and I read it at warp speed. Unfortunately, I never reviewed the book. Seeing a copy of Middlesex for sale by the Friends of Freeman (HCPL), I bought it. I took a more leisurely pace began rereading it after Christmas 2010.

Cal Stephanides, a forty-one year old who identifies himself as a man, climbs his gnarly family tree. He possesses a recessive gene, 5-alpha-reductase deficiency, which made him appear female at the time of his birth. Believing him to be a girl, his parents named their “daughter” Calliope and called her “Callie”. After learning about the syndrome as an adolescent, Calliope changes his name to the masculine name, Cal. Taking on his Greek-American genealogy, Cal tells the story of a dirty little secret of his grandparents, Desdemona and Lefty, which shapes Calliope into Cal.

Upon hearing Oprah selected a book about hermaphrodite, I didn’t imagine myself reading this book. Yet, summer doldrums beset me and I stayed up several nights in a row reading Middlesex. The language Eugenides implements relates this story in a beautifully visual way. He crammed so much between the covers. Throughout, I learned more of the Smyrna fire, Prohibition-Era Detroit, the Nation of Islam, and the Pleasant Valley of Grosse Pointe, Michigan. Eugenides encapsulates much of the contemporary life of Cal in Foreign Service Berlin as well. I enjoyed the mysteries he creates in his brother Chapter Eleven and catalyst The Obscure Object. I laughed at Desdemona’s work for the Nation of Islam and Aunt Lina’s droll tones. Above all else, I considered the sex versus gender argument in a fresh light.

Four and a Half Out of Five Pearls

Song: “Dancing in the Streets” by Martha & the Vandellas

Places: Mt. Olympus, Smyrna, Turkey, Greece, New York City, Detroit, San Francisco, Germany

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With Middlesex being The Detroit Novel, I must link the following Super Bowl Ad:

For More on Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex, please click on the following links:

Top Ten Characters I’d Name My Children After | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

Next week the topic is: Top Ten Favorite Love Stories In Books. See a list of future TTT here.

So, this week is “Top Ten Characters (and Literary Figures) That I’d Name My Children After”

  1. Jo March of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott – While Beth was perhaps my favorite March sister, I admired Jo the most. She was smart, talented, and exceeded expectations. Also, she didn’t need to marry a guy such as Laurie to define herself and this was in the 1860s.
  2. Geoffrey Chaucer – He was one of my favorite authors. In Anya Seton’s Katherine, Chaucer is the titular figure’s brother in-law. He had such a creative mind and I wish he’d been able to finish The Canterbury Tales.
  3. Melanie Wilkes of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell – While Scarlett doggedly chased after her husband, Melanie was both kind and gentle towards her.
  4. Samuel of The Bible – another literary figure – He was the last judge in Israel and my favorite person in the Old Testament.
  5. Taylor of The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver – I wasn’t completely impressed by this character’s name but I loved how she renamed herself. If you’re curious, please read the book.
  6. Ariel of The Tempest by William Shakespeare – He’s unsinkable and rises above his circumstances.
  7. Esperanz of Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan – This character perseveres through the process of going from riches to rags. Her name is beautiful as well.
  8. Rick of “Castle” – The TV show about a mystery writer has spawned books by the same guy.
  9. Katherine Solomon of The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown – I’m not the biggest fan of these Robert Langdon books but I liked this character. I hope Mr. Brown brings her back in the next Langdon.
  10. Rowan from Anna to the Infinite Power by Mildred Ames – While I don’t imagine naming a boy Rowan, I did like this character and found the moniker intriguing.

Top Ten Best Debut Books | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

NEXT WEEK THE TOPIC IS: Top Ten Characters I’d Name My Children After. Click HERE for a list of future Top Ten Tuesday topics.

Top Ten Best Debut Books (of any year..just your favorite debut/”first from an author” books. If you want, you can focus on debuts of a specific year but it’s open to debuts of any year).

* Since I’m suffering from severe congestion at the moment, I’m only listing my picks. Please ask why I chose them and I’ll explain when I’m feeling better.

  1. The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  3. Sense and Sensibility by A Lady (Jane Austen)
  4. The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
  5. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez
  6. The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe
  7. The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri
  8. The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
  9. La Princesse de Clèves by Marie-Madeleine Pioche de La Vergne, comtesse de La Fayette
  10. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel