40 Books!


Jorie's 2011 Reading Challenge

Well, I set a goal of finishing 40 books in 2011. On Monday, 29 August, I accomplished this! So, who thinks I can read 50 books this year?

 

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Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society


The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer | LibraryThing

Shaffer, M. A., & Barrows, A. (2008). The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. New York, N.Y: The Dial Press. 9780385340991

One friend of mine noticed this most curious title on the NYT Bestsellers list. The name compelled her to request the book via HCPL and read it. She recommended it highly for two years. So, this summer, I requested it myself. The book was a collaborative effort between the late Mary Ann Shaffer and her niece Annie Barrows.

Shaffer and Barrows tell their tale through correspondence; this is an epistolary novel. The letters begin in early 1946. London writer Juliet Ashton receives a letter from Dawsey Adams from the Channel Islands, Guernsey to be exact. Dawsey is the current owner of a Charles Lamb book which once belonged to Juliet. Their correspondence leads to discussion of the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, a book club which met on Guernsey Island during the German Occupation. Through many letters, Juliet discovers the light of literature and new friends.

While I felt the book slow in the beginning, I soon found myself riveted. I enjoyed several of the characters and I loved how the authors allowed the characters to speak for themselves. Juliet was my favorite character. At a point fairly early in the book, Juliet requests references from two people – a man who will sing her praises and a woman who will expose all of Juliet’s warts. Juliet’s spirit leapt from the pages. While this takes place after World War II in England, negativity and bleakness are part of the picture. However, these people rise above this and look forward to their brighter futures. 

So, when’s the movie coming to a theater near me?

Four of Five Pearls

Song: ‪Mr Postman – the Marvelettes High Quality‬‏ – YouTube

Setting : Guernsey, Channel Islands, London, England, France, Germany

You might also like:

  •  Atonement by Ian McEwan
  • The Reader by Bernhard Schlink
  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
  • Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary

For more on Shaffer and Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, please check out the following links:

Top Ten Books Jorie Loved But Never Wrote A Review For


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

August 22: Top Ten Books Jorie Love but Never Wrote a Review for

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

3. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

4. An Abundance of Katherines by John Green 

5. Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

6. The Uglies Series by Scott Westerfeld

7. A Room with a View by E.M. Forster

8. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot  

9. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

10. Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

August 16: Top Ten Books that Made Me Hungry


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

August 16: FREEBIE week!

So, I chose books that gave me the munchies:

1. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel

2. Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen

3. The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen

4. The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen

5. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

6. ANY Paula Deen Cookbook

7. Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros

8. The Luxe Series by Anna Godbersen

9. The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver

10. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (weird but I love Greek food)

The Gospel According to Mark


Mantegna's St. Mark | Wikipedia.org

MarkNIV archaeological study Bible: An Illustrated walk through Biblical history and culture. (2005). Grand Rapids, Mich: Zondervan. 9780310938521.

Mark was the second gospel I finished in the Read through the Bible Challenge. The Gospel of Mark is the shortest of the four gospels. Also, this gospel is probably the oldest.  

Beth Moore recognizes Mark as the one who “wrote to tell the Romans what Jesus did” (Moore, 2002). I’ve long viewed Mark as the news journalist of the group. He relays the facts in summary.  

Below is the end of the Gospel. Earliest texts do not include these verses:

9 When Jesus rose early on the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had driven seven demons. 10 She went and told those who had been with him and who were mourning and weeping. 11 When they heard that Jesus was alive and that she had seen him, they did not believe it.

   12 Afterward Jesus appeared in a different form to two of them while they were walking in the country. 13These returned and reported it to the rest; but they did not believe them either.

   14Later Jesus appeared to the Eleven as they were eating; he rebuked them for their lack of faith and their stubborn refusal to believe those who had seen him after he had risen.

   15 He said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation. 16 Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned. 17 And these signs will accompany those who believe: In my name they will drive out demons; they will speak in new tongues; 18they will pick up snakes with their hands; and when they drink deadly poison, it will not hurt them at all; they will place their hands on sick people, and they will get well.”

19 After the Lord Jesus had spoken to them, he was taken up into heaven and he sat at the right hand of God. 20 Then the disciples went out and preached everywhere, and the Lord worked with them and confirmed his word by the signs that accompanied it. (Mark 16: 9 -20)

For more on Mark and Bible-Reading Challenge, check out the following links:

August 9: Top Ten Underrated Books


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

August 9: Top Ten Underrated Books (books you can’t believe aren’t more popular, books that are more obscure, etc.)

1. Julia Alvarez’s A Cafecito Story – This brief work filled me in on green farming in the Dominican Republic. Also, offers a little romance, a little fable, and a lot of importance in today’s global community.

2. Linda Lael Miller’s Vampire Series – Of all the vampires I’ve encountered in literature and other media, the folks presented in Miller’s quartet are my favorite.

3. Madame de (Marie-Madeleine Pioche de La Vergne) La Fayette’s The Princess of Cleves – Here’s a work considered by many to be the first historical fiction novel. She wrote and published a book about the 1500s in the 1600s. As a librarian, I admire Madame de La Fayette’s mad research skills.

4. Winifred Watson’s Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day – I can’t recommend this 1930’s Cinderella story enough to people. That may explain why it’s never on the shelf. Of course, it’s better than the movie.

5. Sarah Dessen’s Keeping the Moon – This is my favorite Dessen book. It’s on the lighter side and things work out in the end.

6. Sarah Dessen’s Dreamland – I feel this book is probably Dessen’s best work. However, I cried all the way through reading it as it tackles some very tough issues.

7. E.M. Forster’s A Room with a View – this amusing book either puts its readers in a good mood or a better mood. Also, I like that it differs from other Forster works.

8. Anya Seton’s Katherine – When are they going to make a movie of this?

9. Caroline B. Cooney’s What Child is This? A Christmas Story –  Cooney is better known for The Face on the Milk Carton books. Yet, this yuletide book has remained with me longer. I always intend to review it some Christmas – maybe this year?

10. Linda Howard’s Open Season – Maybe its main character, a librarian, appeals to me most. Yet, I like recommending it to people who have read all the Stephanie Plum novels. I want to see this movie, too.