Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower


The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky | LibraryThing

Chbosky, S. (1999). The perks of being a wallflower. New York: Pocket Books. 9780671027346

Reasons for Reading : The first time I heard about The Perks of Being a Wallflower was in library school. Stephen Chbosky’s work was banned by the Library Patrons of Texas. I hadn’t thought much about it until I saw that a movie based on the book would come out later in 2012. Thus, I requested and checked out the book from HCPL.

Summary : Assuming the alias “Charlie,” a troubled high school freshman writes letters to an unnamed friend, starting in the 1991. Through these rather intimate letters, Charlie describes his family, his teacher Bill who assigns extra essays to write, his senior friends, Patrick and Sam[antha], and his late Aunt Helen.

What I Liked : Nothing was sugarcoated in this book. Actually, it was pretty raw stuff. The characters were original and realistic.

What I Disliked : Maybe it was necessary for Chbosky to set this in the early 1990s. Yet, it would’ve appealed more if it had been set around the time it was published – 1999. Also, I somber read and not for those looking for some gentle literature.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: The Smiths – Asleep – YouTube

Setting : Pittsburgh, PA

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For more on Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower , check out the following sites:
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Top Ten Books Jorie Has Risked Fines to Finish


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

I added the twist of my having to pay lates fees in order to finish these books. Please consider it more a confession than a boast. Also, I do not endorse keeping your books past the due date 🙂 .

  1. Stephen King’s 11/22/63 
  2. Kenneth C. Davis’ Don’t Know Much About History. . .
  3. Sarah Addison Allen’s The Girl Who Chased the Moon
  4. Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot 
  5. Kathryn Stockett’s The Help
  6. Stieg Larsson’s The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest
  7. Suzanne Collins’ Mockingjay
  8. Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks  
  9. Sarah Dessen’s What Happened to Goodbye?  
  10. John Luerssen’s Rivers’ Edge: The Weezer Story  

Top Ten Books On My Spring TBR List!


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

  1. Stephen King’s 11/22/63 (Currently reading 🙂 )
  2. Beth Revis’ A Million Suns
  3. Denise Rinaldo’s Julius Caesar: Dictator for Life (A Wicked History)
  4. Stephen Greenblatt’s The Swerve: How the World Became Modern
  5. Terry Brooks’ The Sword of Shanara
  6. Lee Strobel’s The Case for Christ
  7. Anna Godbersen’s The Lucky Ones
  8. Rivers Cuomo’s The Pinkerton Diaries
  9. Tim Tebow’s Through My Eyes
  10. Tina Fey’s Bossypants

March Reader of the Month – Janette L.


Janette L. kicks back with a few books

This is the third interview for Reader of the Month.

Four years ago, I applied for a reference librarian position in Clear Lake. Soon after, the branch librarian called me and set up an interview. After the interview, the assistant branch librarian gave me a tour. During this visit, she introduced me to Janette L.

When I started at Freeman, Janette and I became fast friends. Janette is the “Go-To Woman” on many things at the library. This includes all sorts of reading.

1. What’s the best thing you’ve read in the past year?

I would have to say it is a toss up between 3 online items that I read faithfully:

Volume 6 Bonus Wallpaper: Drama!

Girl Genius Online  – a webcomic of Romance, Adventure and Mad Science!  For Romance, Adventure and Mad Science!

Whatever – a blog by writer John Scalzi. For Whatever

Sciguy  – a science blog with Eric Berger. For weather, science stuff & Katy evac jokes

2. Do you have any quirks when it comes to reading?

I can get so absorbed in my reading that I would not hear someone next to me talking.  I discovered this in 3rdgrade when we had a free reading period. I remember looking up and realizing that we were now 15 minutes into the next lesson section.  I was able to switch out books undetected.  Because of this, I usually don’t read books during lunch at work.

3. What’s on your bookshelf or in your book bag?

There is a reason why I have a t-shirt with “Bibliovore” on it.  I admit to leanings towards science fiction, fantasy, mysteries, horror, nonfiction & technical manuals

4. Who supplies your reading material?

The majority comes from the Clear Lake City-County Freeman Library.  Other sources are the Friends of Freeman Bookstore, Half Price Books (in Clear Lake), and Amazon

5. What type of reading do you usually enjoy?

See #3 🙂

6. Who are some authors that you read regardless of anything?

Mercedes Lackey, Anne McCaffery (RIP), Sandra Boynton, and more.  Again see #3

7. What’s on your TBR (to be read) list?

Again see #3.  Due to how voraciously I ready, this can change daily.  I can consume several hundred pages in mere hours.

Bibliovore

8. Can you recall a book that changed your life? How so?

I read a book on space exploration that had been written by Arthur C. Clarke in the 60’s.  I used it as a reference for a report that started “Beep…..beep…..beep…..” then went on to explain about Sputnik, what had followed and what the future could hold.

I then found that Clarke also wrote science FICTION, and went on to discover Asimov, Heinlein and haven’t stopped yet.

9. What was something you enjoyed reading as a child?

Andrew Lang’s Fairy books, these are collections of fairy tales.  Each book has a color in its name.  The Red Fairy Book is one example. There were about a dozen of them & had illustrations.

10. Where do you like to read?

Anywhere comfortable – I usually take a book for reading or puzzles to work when I go anywhere, just in case.

11. Other than reading, what do you like doing?

Fixing things

12. Where can we find you online?

See #1.  Elsewise, I am recently on Google+, if you want to follow me at ireadalota at gmail.com .  You could find me boring.  Be warned, my spam filters are set high, if I get unfamiliar email with odd subject lines.

13. Would you like to make a shout out to any other avid readers that are online?

14. How about sharing five random facts about you?

I have a BS in Mechanical Engineering. I once asked for a vise with anvil plate for Christmas and got one.  I own a 5ft ax with a 14 inch wide blade named “Sir”. 

Leatherman

I can fix many things using just my Leatherman.  I work in a Public Library as a Reference Assistant.

Jorie’s Top Ten Historical Fiction Books


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

  1. Madame de Lafayette’s The Princess of Cleves  
  2. Anya Seton’s Katherine
  3. Katherine Howe’s The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane
  4. Francine Rivers’ Redeeming love: A novel
  5. Ann Rinaldi’s A Break with Charity
  6. Jamie Ford’s Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet: A novel
  7. Robert Graves’ I, Claudius
  8. Gottfried von Strassburg’s Tristan
  9. Joseph Heller’s God Knows
  10. Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex

Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot


The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides | LibraryThing

Eugenides, J. (2011). The marriage plot. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 9780374203054

Reasons for Reading : Yippee!!! Jeffrey Eugenides wrote another book. When I saw The Marriage Plot on the bestseller’s list, I added my name to the waiting list for a copy from HCPL

Summary: Starting the morning of Class of 1982’s graduation from Brown University, Madeleine Hanna faces the cold, hard reality of her breakup with Darwinist biologist Leonard Bankhead and very little promise of grad school in the near future. Her take on the marriage plot and Jane Austen’s novels hasn’t exactly wowed Yale Grad School. More immediately, she must deal with her parents. As the Hannas treat Madeleine to breakfast,  Mitchell Grammaticus, a student of Christian mysticism, who believes Madeleine is his soul mate. As Madeleine and Leonard make up and head out to a lab on Cape Cod, Mitchell takes a world tour, aiming to forget Madeleine.

What I Liked : Author Jeffrey Eugenides describes everything so well. I could see these dysfunctional characters. While I am a generation behind them, I still recognized the confusion of life beyond graduaton. Characters such as Madeleine and Mitchell were quite familiar because all three of us over-analyze practically everything.

The ending, which I will not reveal, was to my liking as well.

What I Disliked : One of my friends who read the book before I did warned me about some extra descriptive passages within the book. Going in with my eyes open, I found this book to have high cringe factor.

Also, I wished for more breaks – such as chapters. The Marriage Plot definitely is broken down into parts. However, these sections were, well, stealthy. With these Ivy League alum, much intertextuality can be found with the covers. That’s cool, especially the mention of Ludwig Bemelman’s Madeline. While this techniques offers context, it also made the book with the long sections seem infinitely longer. I’m not even going to touch the semiotics within, either.

I wanted to throttle, above all other characters, Leonard and Madeleine’s sister, Alwyn. Amongst a strange and disillusioned and delusional cast, these two deserved the padded cells and straight jackets the most.

Lastly, I liked both The Virgin Suicides and Middlesex better. Eugenides’ previous novels offered, above all else, unique narrators. The former spoke in the form of a group of men reflecting upon something from their adolescence while the latter had the incomparably omniscient Cal Stephanides. The Marriage Plot had ordinary third person omniscient points of view.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: Talking Heads – “Once In A Lifetime” – YouTube

Setting : Providence, Rhode Island; Detroit, New York City, New Jersey; Portland, Oregan; Cape Cod, Boston, Provincetown, India, France, Ireland, Greece

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For more on Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Marriage Plot, check out the following sites: