TBRs – Marilu Henner’s Total Memory Makeover


Total memory makeover by Marilu Henner | WorldCat Detailed Record

Henner, M., & Henner, L. (2012). Total memory makeover: Uncover your past, take charge of your future. New York: Gallery Books. 9781451651218

This book was among the new stuff I’ve checked into the system. I’ll request it soon. Let’s hope I’ll remember!

Advertisements

April Reader of the Month – Kat B.


This is the fourth interview for Reader of the Month.

Back when I was at Baylor, I was lucky enough to land work-study at the Armstrong Browning Library. Kat B., my boss there, is responsible for this. My experience there led me to become a librarian, too. When I ventured outside the Baylor Bubble, I was blessed to maintain contact with Kat B. Not only is she my friend, she’s one of the most intriguing people I know.

1. What’s the best thing you’ve read in the past year?

Beauty by Roger Scruton.  It has to do with aesthetics–why art, architecture, fashion, and general living spaces have become ugly instead of beautiful, why kitsch and sentimentality have replaced refined culture. There are several authors who seem to me to be straight thinking in a twisted world and he is one of them. It spurred me on to read some books along similar lines, notably, Art’s Prospect by Roger Kimball, From Bauhaus to Our House by Tom Wolfe, Money for Art by David A. Smith, and finally A New Theory of Urban Design by Christopher Alexander, Hajo Neis, Artemis Anninou, Ingrid King.

2. Do you have any quirks when it comes to reading?

I want to know everything in the world. I began calculating how much time I’ve spent reading, how long it’s taken me to get this far, and decided that there simply isn’t time for me to read everything I’d like to before I die, even if I live to be 80. I’m trying to focus more than ever before on topics specific to my writing projects, practical things I am involved in–the world of art and museums, and how-tos for practical living. I’ve also made it a point to buy the works of certain favorite authors and poets: Doyle; Dumas, le pere; Kipling; and the Brownings. (I can’t read every classic author before I die and get anything done.) I’m taking the time to savor works, because I had to read them on the fly most of my life.

3. What’s on your bookshelf or in your book bag?

The Triumph of Individual Style: A guide to dressing your body, your beauty, your self by Carla Mason Mathis and Helen Villa Connor–positively the best book of its kind I’ve ever picked up, bar none.

4. Who supplies your reading material?

Before I moved, I bought a lot of used books from various places. I still do, but very, very rarely. Mostly I get books through interlibrary loan and there are several university libraries near me, one of which I will apply for a card very soon.

5. What type of reading do you usually enjoy?

I read mostly non-fiction. That’s because I want to understand and fix everything in the world. However, one may say that I read “everything” but we cannot take that too literally. I also pour over biblical sources a lot.

6. Who are some authors that you read regardless of anything?

There are no authors I read regardless of anything (if I understand the question). Certainly some authors will remain in my heart for life.

7. What’s on your TBR (to be read) list?

The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution by Francis Fukuyama. I’ve perused it a bit and, frankly, consider it the outstanding work of our time. (While we are at it, I have always secretly wondered why every serious work warrants a title with a colon and then a descriptor!)

8. Can you recall a book that changed your life? How so?

Many. Several come to mind, but if I had to choose it would be Abandonment to Divine Providence (sometimes translated as The Sacrament of the Present Moment) by J.P. de Caussade. It greatly elucidated the work of Jesus Christ in our every waking moment, whether that moment is happy or traumatic.

9. What was something you enjoyed reading as a child?

The Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. It taught me to care about poor little children everything, to never side with bullies, and to think of myself as a little princess in disguise whenever I felt too poor to measure up.

10. Where do you like to read?

Anywhere, mostly just alone or while waiting somewhere.

11. Other than reading, what do you like doing?

Is there anything else?  I’ve taken up sewing and bicycling again between a lot of random activities.

12. Where can we find you online?

You can find me on a Beta version of a Web site I started in August at The Sea Pearl (which I’m still developing and plan to add to in time) and on my professional blog at Kathryn Brogdon .

13. Would you like to make a shout out to any other avid readers that are online?

Okay, ahem… What is “shout out”?

14. How about sharing five random facts about you?

Random craziness, huh? Let’s see…a) I used to be a Girl Scout, b) I have two grown children, c) I studied journalism, Spanish, history and museology in university, d) I worked at the Armstrong Browning Library before e) moving to Spokane, WA with my husband artist Melville Holmes.

Top Ten Books That Had Totally Deceptive Covers


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

  1. Margaret Atwood’s The Blind Assassin 
  2. Kathryn Stockett’s The Help
  3. Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies
  4. Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina
  5. Natalie Babbit’s Tuck Everlasting
  6. Jayne Castle’s Ghost Hunter
  7. Sarah Dessen’s Keeping the Moon
  8. Nicholas Sparks’ The Notebook
  9. Tina Fey’s Bossypants
  10. Anya Seton’s Katherine

TBRs – Joyce Meyer’s Do yourself a favor– forgive


Do Yourself A Favor…Forgive by Joyce Meyer | LibraryThing

Meyer, J. (2012). Do yourself a favor– forgive: Learn how to take control of your life through forgiveness. New York: FaithWords. 978-0446547277

I saw it on a cart today and I’ve requested it. Just the title alone spoke to me.

John Grisham’s The Firm


The Firm | WorldCat Detailed Record

Grisham, J., & Brick, S. (2002). The Firm. Santa Ana, CA: Books on Tape. 9780736688604

Reasons for Reading:  I saw blurbs an upcoming TV show based on John Grisham’s The Firm . It featured Josh Lucas as the main character. Yet, I hesitated to watch the show because I wanted to read the book first. (I’d seen the movie back around the time it came out on video.) Thus, I requested the audiobook via HCPL.

Summary:  Harvard Law student, Mitchell Y. McDeere, works hard. He and his college sweetheart wife, Abby, have next to nothing. McDeere’s brother, Ray, is imprisoned. As Mitch graduates third in his class, a small Memphis tax firm called Bendini, Lambert and Locke comes knocking. The firm offers him and Abby a life of luxury – a large salary, a low-rate mortgage on a house, a BMW, and vacations at company owned places in Colorado and the Cayman Islands. The McDeeres leap at this chance with little consideration for any possible catches. Soon, though, Mitch discovers things aren’t as wonderful as they first appeared.

What I Liked : This story about an attorney seems authentic and I think that’s due to Grisham writing what he knew. Not only did I appreciate this, I also liked that he broke things down in layman’s terms. While I’m not a law professional, I could easily follow the action. In my mind’s eye, I could see these characters and events.

What I Disliked: I only have one tiny complaint; I wished there had been dates offered for the action. Mitch’s brother Rusty died fighting in Vietnam. International flights were simple, pre-9/11. Very little takes place using cell phones or the Internet, too. Some time stamps would’ve been awesome.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: ‪Charlie Rich • No Headstone on My Grave – YouTube

Setting : Memphis, Boston, Washington D.C, The Cayman Islands

You might also like:

For more on John Grisham’s The Firm, please check out the following links:

Top Ten Books To Read In A Day


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

  1. Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince
  2. Caroline B. Cooney’s What Child is This? A Christmas Story
  3. Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal
  4. Julia Alvarez’s A Cafecito Story
  5. Scholastic’s A Wicked History Series
  6. Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars
  7. Sarah Dessen’s Keeping the Moon  
  8. Louis Sachar’s Holes
  9. Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Milhone Series
  10. Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s