Stephen King’s 11/22/63


11/22/63: A Novel by Stephen King | LibraryThing

King, S. (2011). 11/22/63: A novel. New York: Scribner. 9781451627282

Reasons for Reading : I read Stephen King’s The Dead Zone a few years ago after reading King’s memoir On Writing. In The Dead Zone, teacher and coma survivor John Smith asks “If you could kill Hitler, would you?” When I saw 11/22/63 on the NYT Bestsellers List, I realized King took this same question in a different direction. I added my name to the waiting list for a copy from HCPL. Later, I purchased a copy from the Friends of Freeman Library Bookstore.

Summary: Jake Epping teaches English at Lisbon Falls High in Lisbon Falls, Maine. He also earns
extra money by taking on GED courses. Reading janitor Harry Dunning’s essay about the horrific night when Harry lost his family and gained a limp fifty years prior moves the normally dry-eyed Jake to tears.

Soon after Harry earns his GED, diner owner Al shares a secret with Jake; there’s a portal outside his supply room which leads to September 1958. Thus, Al enlists Jake on a mission to save JFK from assassination.

What I Liked : I appreciated the short segments which allowed me to read a little bit at a time. I also enjoyed the whole “What if?” aspect. I liked how King limited some of the possibilities by creating a 1958 portal instead of putting Jake into a time machine that could go anywhere or anytime.

What I Disliked : As a Texan (a Houstonian), my familiarity with state geography is above average 🙂 . I wouldn’t describe Dallas and Killeen as being all that close. Also, Killeen has two “L’s” unlike how it’s spelled throughout the book. Then, there’s the whole saying “Everything’s bigger in Texas.” That’s because the state itself is the second biggest in the USA. Having gone to college in Waco which is in Central Texas, I can attest to the fact that I could not smell the oil fumes from Midland and Odessa. Lastly, I didn’t think this book should’ve been over 800 pages!

 Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: In the Mood by Glenn Miller – YouTube

Setting : Maine, Florida, Texas

You might also like:

For more on Stephen King’s11/22/63, check out the following sites:

Top Ten Books Written In The Past 10 Years That I Hope People Are Still Reading In 30 Years


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here will answer. Everyone is welcome to join! All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It’s a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.
Future Top Ten Tuesday topics are posted here.
  1. Kathryn Stockett’s The Help
  2. Stephen King’s 11/22/63
  3. Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
  4. Jamie Ford’s Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
  5. Katherine Howe’s The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane
  6. Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao 
  7. Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
  8. Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex
  9. Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake
  10. William P. Young’s The Shack 

TBRs – Christopher Moore’s Sacre bleu: A comedy d’art


Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d’Art by Christopher Moore | LibraryThing

Moore, C. (2012). Sacre bleu: A comedy d’art. New York: William Morrow. 9780061779749

My mom saw a book review in the Houston Chronicle. Then, she requested the book via HCPL. After its arrival, I’m inclined to follow suit.

Seeing the Story – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (English)


Theatrical release poster | Wikipedia

Fincher, D., Rudin, S., Zaillian, S., Wallen, M., Faurbye, F. A., Søndberg, O., Stærmose, S., … Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (Firm). (2012). The girl with the dragon tattoo. Culver City, Calif: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment.

Reasons for Watching: I read all three books in The Millennium Trilogy over the summer. Since I didn’t make it to the cinema to see The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, I requested the DVD via HCPL.

Summary : The paths of convicted journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Daniel Craig) and young, asocial computer hacker Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara) cross as Blomkvist works to “write” the biography of wealthy patriarch Henrik Vanger (Christopher Plummer). Really, Vanger wants Blomkvist to solve the mystery of the disappearance of Vanger’s grandniece, Harriet (Moa Garpendal). As Blomkvist and Salander collaborate, they uncover the ugly truth of one of Sweden’s richest families.  

Book to Movie Adaptation : The movie followed the first book quite faithfully. There were a couple of changes, of course. Yet, I’m not going to post those here as they took place in middle or latter part of the movie. I wish the plot line concerning Harriet Vanger hadn’t been skewed. Otherwise, I was happy.

Review : After reading the books, I was really excited to see the movie. I was uncertain about some of the actors but it was all good. I was riveted to the screen. Maybe I was rubber necking.

Three Out of Five Pearls 

Jorie’s Top Ten Blogs/Sites That AREN’T about Books


 

Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

 
Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
 
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here will answer. Everyone is welcome to join! All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It’s a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.
 
Future Top Ten Tuesday topics are posted here.
 
Today’s TTT is a little bit different than usual:  it’s non-book related.  I don’t think we’ve had a Top Ten list not related to books, reading or anything literary before?  
 
  1. FM STRIDERS | 8 WEEKS HEALTH AND WELLNESS CHALLENGE
  2. Stormie Holguin 
  3. Shiftless Chef
  4. Amy Coffin’s Genealogy Site
  5. GeneaBloggers
  6. Ancestry.com | Blog
  7. Lisa’s History Room
  8. Weezer
  9. Deep Breath Ministries
  10. Tallowood Baptist Church

 

 

Joseph J. Ellis’ Founding Brothers


Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis | LibraryThing

Ellis, J. J., & Runger, N. (2001). Founding brothers: The revolutionary generation. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books. 9781402505393

Reasons for Reading:  I found the book on the shelf at the HCPL branch where I work. Partially inspired by my girlhood crush on Thomas Jefferson (or was it Ken Howard playing Jefferson in 1776?), I checked out this audiobook. The first copy I borrowed had a scratch so I had to request another copy. The bottom line, though, I eventually got to read this book!

Summary: In shades of Paul Harvey “The Rest of the Story,” Ellis tells of the relationships between those the United States often refers to as the Founding Fathers – John Adams, Aaron Burr, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington. Ellis pinpoints six different moments which exhibit these relationships in their truest form. These include:

Burr and Hamilton’s deadly duel, and what may have really happened; Hamilton, Jefferson, and Madison’s secret dinner, during which the seat of the permanent capital was determined in exchange for passage of Hamilton’s financial plan; Franklin’s petition to end the “peculiar institution” of slavery–his last public act–and Madison’s efforts to quash it; Washington’s precedent-setting Farewell Address, announcing his retirement from public office and offering his country some final advice; Adams’s difficult term as Washington’s successor and his alleged scheme to pass the presidency on to his son; and finally, Adams and Jefferson’s renewed correspondence at the end of their lives, in which they compared their different views of the Revolution and its legacy.   

– Joseph J. Ellis

Using these events, Ellis supports his claim that these men squabbled as though they were siblings.

What I Liked : Ellis excelled at filling in the blanks as he could. He rendered great portraits of these greats. I knew very little about Aaron Burr other than the “Got Milk?” commercial.

What I Disliked : I wasn’t crazy about the hopping around with the book. I wished Ellis had stayed closer to the original sequence of events.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: ‪But Mr. Adams – 1776 (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) – YouTube

Setting: Thirteen Colonies, The USA

You might also like:

  • Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
  • Don’t Know Much About History: Everything You Need to Know About American History but Never Learned by Kenneth C. Davis
  • Wolf By the Ears by Ann Rinaldi
For more on Joseph J. Ellis’ Founding brothers…, please check out the following links:
 

May Reader of the Month – Beverly B.


This is the fifth interview for Reader of the Month.

I met Beverly B. several years ago at my old church.  I liked Beverly right away as we’re both cat people and readers. Later, Beverly and I found ourselves in the same Bible Study group. As she often remains quiet in larger groups, I do listen when she speaks up. Read on and see what I’m saying!

1. What’s the best thing you’ve read in the past year?        

The Girl Who Chased the Moon by Sarah

Beverly and Her Granddaughter Enjoy A Book

Addison Allen

2. Do you have any quirks when it comes to reading? 

I really enjoy a good love story but I don’t want a blow by blow account of any sexual activities.  Leave something to the imagination.  I really like stories that are in eras gone by.

3. What’s on your bookshelf or in your book bag?  

The Hunger Games Trilogy, Saving Max by Antoinette van Heugten

4. Who supplies your reading material?   

Amazon.com via Kindle

5. What type of reading do you usually enjoy?  

Novels with a good plot that I can’t figure out with a little love story to them

6. Who are some authors that you read regardless of anything? 

John Grisham, Diana Gabaldon

7. What’s on your TBR (to be read) list?  

The Litigators by John Grisham, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

8. Can you recall a book that changed your life? How so? 

Actually it is a series of books by Philippa Carr that follows a family from the time of Queen Elizabeth I through World War II.  The first book is The Lion Triumphant, and continues on with 10 more books.  At the time I originally read these I was going through a difficult time in my life and trying to deal with how to handle death.  These books helped me to accept that we all have to die, that death is a part of life. 

9. What was something you enjoyed reading as a child? 

Greek Mythology

10. Where do you like to read? 

Prefer to be laying down on my daybed with a really soft blanket and a comfortable feather pillow

11. Other than reading, what do you like doing? 

Going to church, listening to music, working in the garden, mosaic and playing on the computer.  Want to learn weaving when I move to the country

12. Where can we find you online? 

Facebook

13. Would you like to make a shout out to any other avid readers that are online? 

Don’t have anyone in particular to shout out to but I enjoy getting ideas about authors I might want to check out.

14. How about sharing five random facts about you? 

Like alternative rock music, love my cat, can’t wait to retire next year, born on Friday the 13th, won first place in a beauty contest when I was 5 years old