June Reader of the Month – Candice P.


This is the sixth interview for Reader of the Month.

About ten months ago, my current place of employment began interviewing for part-time reference

Candice P.

assistants. Just the interviews excited the staff. While waiting her turn, Candice P. and I talked about the library, the community, and the fact that she was studying to be a librarian at my alma mater – North Texas. When Candice landed the position, I was overjoyed. Candice and I became fast friends. She’s one of my go-to people, especially for book recommendations.

1. What’s the best thing you’ve read in the past year?

I don’t think I read anything mind blowing or life changing this year, but I did finally read Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen, and I thought it was amazing. I also read The Hunger Games, and enjoyed it.

2. Do you have any quirks when it comes to reading?

I do, but mainly I have character quirks. If they are too annoying or constantly make ridiculous decisions that don’t make any sense that really annoys me. In my opinion, that doesn’t mean that the characters are just annoying, but that the writing isn’t up to par as well. Of course, sometimes the writing is brilliant, and I just don’t care for the character. I think character compatibility is kind of like making friends. You don’t always want to read about people that you wouldn’t hang out with, and sometimes you enjoy reading about characters that would make great enemies. It’s kind of a fickle balance, at least in my case.   I think my biggest quirk is that my tastes in reading are so random. I really love books within a series, because I get to know the characters really well. I love it when I can get swept away by a story that goes on for several books!

3. What’s on your bookshelf or in your book bag?

1984 is in my purse, Nicholas Spark’s True Believer and Stephen King’s 11/22/63 are on my iPod, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is on my Kindle, and My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult and Bossypants by Tina Fey are on my nightstand….and there are too many books on my bookshelf but there is a whole lot on there of Orson Scott Card’s various works, including the graphic novels, which are amazing.

4. Who supplies your reading material?

I have a Kindle, so Amazon, Half Priced Books, or the library.

5. What type of reading do you usually enjoy?

As I said before, I really enjoy books where the author does an excellent job with character development. As far as genre, I enjoy books that have paranormal or science fiction aspects to them. I usually am open to reading to different genres, though.

6. Who are some authors that you read regardless of anything?

Nicholas Sparks, J.K. Rowling (I have only read Harry Potter, but she has a new book coming out soon! YAY! ) Meg Cabot, Orson Scott Card, and Stephen King, though some of his really scary stuff is a bit much for me as I get older. I wish that I could say I read a lot of really intelligent non-fiction books, but when I read for entertainment, it is usually exciting or humorous works of fiction.

7. What’s on your TBR (to be read) list?

A lot. The rest of The Hunger Games trilogy, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, My Sister’s Keeper, The Circle Series by Ted Dekker, Mother of Storms by John Barnes, and a slew of graphic novels and anime series because I recently discovered that I think they’re awesome.  There are many more books on that list.

8. Can you recall a book that changed your life? How so?

If this is a book that actually changed my life, I would have to choose something Christian based because that is the biggest change that happened to me in my adulthood. So, of course, there is the Bible. Other than  that I remember reading Max Lucado’s It’s Not About Me in college, and that was a really good one that put some things in perspective.  I also loved The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom.

9. What was something you enjoyed reading as a child?

I got started on chapter books at a really young age and probably read more than I do even now.  I really enjoyed reading Stephen King when I was pretty young…though I don’t think that will be something I ever give my children. I turned out relatively normal though, so I suppose it is okay. Other than that I really enjoyed realistic and historic fiction as a child and teen, which is strange because as an adult I enjoy fantasy and science fiction more! My favorite book as a young child was Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.

10. Where do you like to read?

When it’s not hot outside I love reading outside. Other than that I love to read in bed before I go to sleep at night.

11. Other than reading, what do you like doing?

I love hanging out with my husband, cooking, going to the beach and just being with people whose company I enjoy. Sometimes where you are or what you’re doing isn’t always as important as whom you’re with. I also love playing video games. I really love movies, too. I used to be that person in class who quoted movies all the time….

12. Where can we find you online?

Facebook and Google Plus, though I do absolutely nothing on there.

13. Would you like to make a shout out to any other avid readers that are online?

Hi! *waves enthusiastically *

14. How about sharing five random facts about you?

I am such a boring person, so this one is tough for me. I love frogs, I have incredibly random and sporadic tastes in reading and music, I enjoy cheesy science fiction movies (especially Mystery Science Theatre style), I really love being married and have a wonderful husband…and I love the beach!

15. What do you challenge people to read?

I don’t there is anything specific that I would challenge people to read, but I always think it is good to stretch ourselves outside of our comfort zone, in one way or another. I think we can get stuck in ruts when it comes to reading, and I try to challenge myself to read genres I wouldn’t normally read. I have tried to challenge myself this year to go back and read some of the classics that I never read, or ones that I haven’t read in years! I think that is a good, realistic challenge for everybody. Go and read a classic book you continuously hear about, but have never actually read. Go! Now!

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Top Ten Summer TBR List


 

Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesdayis an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It’s a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics, check them out here!

 

It’s time for another of those Top Ten Seasonal Lists, this time we’re talking books you have on your Summer TBR lists! As always, it can be either books you’re dying to read now it’s starting to get warm or anticipated new releases.

So, I sort of jumped the gun and did a Summer TBR list last week.  Still and all, here’s a refresher 🙂
 
  1. J.A. Jance’s Until Proven Guilty (A J.P. Beaumont Mystery)
  2. Sue Grafton’s I is for Innocent 
  3. Marilu Henner’s Total Memory Makeover 
  4. Anna Godbersen’s Beautiful Days
  5. Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass
  6. Beth Revis‘ A Million Suns: An Across the Universe Novel
  7. John Grisham’s The Client
  8. Joyce Meyer’s Do Yourself a Favor – Forgive
  9. Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth
  10. Pat Conroy’s My Reading Life

TBRs – Kim Edwards’ The Memory Keeper’s Daughter


The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards | LibraryThing

Edwards, K. (2005). The memory keeper’s daughter. New York: Viking. 9780670034161

One of my friends on Goodreads asked me to read this book. So, I’m requesting The Memory Keeper’s Daughter via HCPL.

Celebrating Bloomsday, With James Joyce (and Other Irish Writers) – NYTimes.com


http://6thfloor.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/15/celebrating-bloomsday-with-james-joyce-and-other-irish-writers/

Celebrating Bloomsday, With James Joyce (and Other Irish Writers)

Rosie Schaap

Readers picked up on the not-so-subtle nod to James Joyce’s “Ulysses” at the end of my June “Drink” column. Hey, it was hard to resist: for those who love the book, any walk around Dublin in some way evokes the company of Leopold Bloom, Stephen Dedalus and others. It seems you can never get far without passing a landmark that appears in the novel.

For example, in Dublin last month, I stayed for a few days with a friend who lives about a block away from the now-defunct Ormond Hotel. The hotel’s restaurant was the location for much of the “Sirens” episode of the novel.

Tomorrow, June 16, is Bloomsday, the day on which the action in “Ulysses” transpires, observed by Joyce fans the world over. In New York, Symphony Space will stage its 31st annual “Bloomsday on Broadway,” a program of live readings from the novel and music. And this year, as it happens, the focus is on “Sirens.” The event will conclude with the actress Fionnula Flanagan reading Molly Bloom’s celebrated soliloquy, with which the book ends, unabridged and uncensored. (And if you can’t make it to the Upper West Side, the whole thing will be streamed, live, on the Symphony Space Web site).

I’ll take some time out on Bloomsday to listen and to dip into my favorite sections of “Ulysses” (including “Cyclops,” set in Barney Kiernan’s Pub). But it’s also a fine occasion to explore the contemporary Irish fiction landscape, including these recent debut novels:

As for thematic drinks — if you’re into that sort of thing — the obvious choices would be stout or whiskey, which turn up throughout “Ulysses.” But so do many other beverages: There’s porter, gin, brandy, rum and even absinthe. Bloom himself seems to favor wine and cider, and even though cider didn’t treat him too well, I suspect it’s just what I’ll want to drink if it turns out to be a warm and sunny Bloomsday.

How will you celebrate Bloomsday? What will you drink? And who are your favorite Irish writers, past and present?

Top Ten Beach Reads – OR – Top Ten TBR


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish
My take on this week’s TTT is more of a TBR list. 🙂
  1. J.A. Jance’s Until Proven Guilty (A J.P. Beaumont Mystery)
  2. Sue Grafton’s I is for Innocent 
  3. Marilu Henner’s Total Memory Makeover 
  4. Anna Godbersen’s Beautiful Days
  5. Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass
  6. Beth Revis‘ A Million Suns: An Across the Universe Novel
  7. John Grisham’s The Client
  8. Joyce Meyer’s Do Yourself a Favor – Forgive
  9. Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth
  10. Pat Conroy’s My Reading Life

Top Ten Rewind/ Top Ten Characters


 

Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

 
Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
 
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here will answer. Everyone is welcome to join! All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists! If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. Have fun with it! It’s a fun way to get to know your fellow bloggers.
 
Future Top Ten Tuesday topics are posted here.
For my rewind topic today, I’ve picked Top Ten Favorite Characters . These are just some of my current favorites 🙂
 
  1. Geoffrey Chaucer of Anya Seton’s Katherine
  2. Kinsey Milhone of Sue Grafton’s Alphabet Series
  3. Stephen Kumalo of Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country
  4. Ashima Ganguli of Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake
  5. Cinna of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games
  6. Lucy Honeychurch of E.M. Forster’s A Room with a View
  7. Atticus Finch of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird
  8. Connie Goodwin of Katherine Howe’s The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane
  9. John Smith of Stephen Kings’s The Dead Zone
  10. Mac Phillips of William P. Young’s The Shack