The Sunday Post ~ sharing blog news and book haul ~ Jorie’s 30th Edition


Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer: The Sunday Gazette

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer.
~this meme was inspired in part by ~ In My Mailbox~

It’s a chance to share News.

A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

This is your news post, so personalize it! Include as much as you want or as little.
Be creative, it can be a vlog or just a showcase of your goodies.

Anyone can participate as long as you:

This is your news post, so personalize it! Include as much as you want or as little.
Be creative, it can be a vlog or just a showcase of your goodies.

Anyone can participate as long as you:

Enter your link on my post – Sundays beginning at 12:01 am (CST) (link will be open all week)

Link back to this post or this blog

(Happy Easter! I wish you a day of rebirth, reflection, and refined Cadbury Creme Eggs!)

Last week on Jorie’s Reads, I:

This week, I hope to:

  • Post my 30th edition of The Sunday Post 🙂
  • Doing a different sort of TTT
  • Post reviews
  • Finish reading:  Zondervan’s The Bible in 90 Days: Cover to Cover in 12 Pages a Day (The Bible in 90 Days) (Week Four)

Around the Blogosphere:

  • I’d like to thank the following bloggers for following me.

–        Kurt Rees 

–        ImmodiumAbuser 

–        TheCOF

–        ioniamartin

DNF:

  • David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas – Mea culpa – I just couldn’t get into it right now. So, I did the noble thing and checked in my eBook and moved onto one of my TBRs – Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and GlassSo far, so good. 

My Book Haul:

  • Holy Bible: Archaeological Study Bible-NIV: An Illustrated Walk Through Biblical History and Culture 
  • Lee Strobel’s The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus 
  • Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass
  • Zondervan’s The Bible in 90 Days: Cover to Cover in 12 Pages a Day (The Bible in 90 Days) (Week Three)
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March 2013 Reader of the Month – Adam H.


This is the fifteenth interview for Reader of the Month.

Adam H.

Adam H.

I met Adam H. around the time he began dating my friend, his future wife, Kendal H. (See August 2012 Reader of the Month.) Kendal mentioned in her interview that Adam recommends many books she enjoyed. Adam also encouraged me to set up my own Audible account and to create Jorie’s Store on Amazon. Of course, I wanted to interview him!

1. What’s the best thing you’ve read in the past year?

The first two books in the Expanse Trilogy are as good as people say they are. I really liked 11/22/63 and Cradle to Cradle. Why Nations Fail is a really powerful book.

2.  Do you have any quirks when it comes to reading?

Some people have strong feelings about whether audiobooks count as “reading,” which is the only way I read anything long-form.

3.  What’s on your bookshelf or in your book bag?

The Gripping Hand, Heat, The Rational Optimist, The Wise Man’s Fear, and I’m slooooooowly finishing The Passage of Power by Robert Caro.

4. Who supplies your reading material?

All over the place.  Leo Laporte’s podcasts give a lot of suggestions (they wrap their Audible.com ads with book recommendtions), as do Tyler Cowen and Taegan Goddard’s blogs. I’m still catching up on classic/hard sci-fi; the Sword and Laser podcast is a great source for these. Sometimes I get book suggestions from The Economist.

5.  What type of reading do you usually enjoy?

Finance, art, and technology blogs in Google Reader.

6.  Who are some authors that you read regardless of anything?

When I was young I felt that way about Stephen King, but the last two Dark Tower books were super disappointing. That said, I enjoyed 11-22-63.

7. What’s on your TBR (to be read) list?

The Big Year – Mark Obmascik

Wool – Hugh Howey

8. Can you recall a book that changed your life? How so?

No, but I’m not the most reflective person 🙂

9.   What was something you enjoyed reading as a child?

Comics. Lots and lots of comics.

10.  Where do you like to read?

While mowing the grass. We mow the lawn a lot in Florida. Roy Dotrice’s voice (he read 150+ hours of The Song of Ice and Fire series) will forever remind me of mowing my back yard.

11.  Other than reading, what do you like doing?

Working. Amateur photography. Traveling. Legos – many, many Legos.

12.  Where can we find you online?

@adamharder on twitter. Which reminds me I need to get something up on www.adamharder.com

13.  Would you like to make a shout out to any other avid readers that are online?

14.  What do you challenge people to read?

Go get Google Reader setup.  Seriously, it’s worth it. www.google.com/reader

15.   How about sharing five random facts about you?

1. I’m conducting a very slow (two years and running) ebay garage sale and I’ve successfully sold junkmail on Ebay.
2. I use an aeropress for my morning coffee, which combined with the Legos makes me both a hipster and a crackpot.

3. I’ve made my living from behind a computer all day every day for 15 years and I can’t type.

4. I was really hung-up on #3 until this January 🙂

5. Python is my favorite language.

An Easter Egg Hunt


Easter Eggs And Books Wallpaper

As Wikipedia puts it, an “Easter egg is an intentional hidden message, inside joke, or feature in a work such as a computer program, movie, book, or crossword.”

Here are some Easter Eggs listed on The Easter Egg Archive:

1) In Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, the Mad Hatter asked Alice at the Tea Party how a Raven is like a Writing desk. Carrol never answers his own riddle. The answer is “Poe wrote on both.” – Prince Mu-Chao

2) The name of the rat in  E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web was “Templeton”. White was a Fiji (Phi Gamma Delta). He named the rat after one of the founders of the fraternity (John Templeton McCarty). – okman

3) On the back cover of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code, other writers praise this work. Near the fourth comment there are coordinates written sideways heading north. These coordinates are for a sculpture located on the grounds of CIA headquarters in Langley, VA. It contains thousands of encrypted messages, of which a fourth section (containing about 98 characters) have yet to be cracked!! – ashouser

4) In Douglas Adams’s The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, there’s mention of the worst poetry in the Universe was created by Paula Nancy Millstone Jennings. In the original radio series, this was a reference to Paul Neil Milne Johnstone. However, Adams was forced to retract the name for later recordings and for the book. (Johnstone is a real person, a sample of his poetry can be found at http://www.pictographics.com/poetry.html) – Inguin

5) It’s probably typical of a lot of authors but best-selling mystery writer Michael Connelly (The Poet, Blood Work, ) frequently names minor characters after people he knows, particularly former colleagues at the Los Angeles Times. Anyone familiar with the staff of the newspaper’s San Fernando Valley office in Chatsworth should recognize many names throughout Connelly’s novels. One book (can’t remember which) makes reference to an old L.A. Times photo by Boris Lugavere, a reference to Boris Yaro and Joel Lugavere, two longtime photographers at the paper. – Anonymous

6) In  John Fowle’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman, the two main characters fall asleep on a train. A mysterious stranger enters the car, looks them over, smiles, and leaves. The book comments, strangely, that this man was “satisfied” with their progress. Many Fowles fans believe that it is the author putting himself in the novel. – Al Ronnfeldt

7) The enduring fame of Poe’s dark tales and poems — such as The Raven, The Black Cat, The Telltale Heart, and The Pit and the Pendulum — have long overshadowed his strong penchant for hoaxes and puzzles. In fact, he ran several hoaxes as apparently legit news articles… In 2 of his later poems, “A Valentine” and “An Enigma”, you can find hidden names by reading the first letter of line 1, second letter of line 2, and so on… “A Valentine” spells the name of Frances Sargent Osgood, while “An Enigma” spells Sarah Anna Lewis, both poets whose work Poe reviewed. – Anonymous

Top Ten Books Jorie Always Recommends


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

jen’s top ten books she recommends the most

  1. Meg Waite Clayton’s The Wednesday Sisters 
  2. E.M. Forster’s’ A Room With A View 
  3. Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
  4. Alexander McCall Smith’s The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency 
  5. Katherine Howe’s The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane 
  6. Julia Alvarez’s A Cafecito Story 
  7. Winifred Watson’s Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day 
  8. Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake 
  9. Linda Howard’s Open Season

Libretto Reviews – on second thought


Front cover of the original 1899 libretto | Tosca – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Well, I read Rigoletto without any issue. That’s because I recalled seeing Verdi’s opera performed. Since it impressed me, I still remember.

Then, I tried Tosca‘s libretto and recording. Since I haven’t the pleasure of seeing the performance, I couldn’t get into it. The plot is moving, the voices lustrous. However, I decided operas, like plays, must be seen rather than read. Thus, I’m not reviewing any of these operas I haven’t seen performed.

The Sunday Post ~ sharing blog news and book haul ~ Jorie’s 29th Edition


Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer: The Sunday Gazette

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer.
~this meme was inspired in part by ~ In My Mailbox~

It’s a chance to share News.

A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog.

This is your news post, so personalize it! Include as much as you want or as little.
Be creative, it can be a vlog or just a showcase of your goodies.

Anyone can participate as long as you:

This is your news post, so personalize it! Include as much as you want or as little.
Be creative, it can be a vlog or just a showcase of your goodies.

Anyone can participate as long as you:

Enter your link on my post – Sundays beginning at 12:01 am (CST) (link will be open all week)

Link back to this post or this blog

Last week on Jorie’s Reads, I:

This week, I hope to:

  • Post my 29th edition of The Sunday Post 🙂
  • Participate in The Broke and the Bookish’s Top Ten Tuesday – Top Ten  Books I Recommend The Most
  • Post reviews
  • Share March 2013 Reader of the Month – Adam H.
  • Finish reading: Libba Bray’s The Sweet Far Thing and Zondervan’s The Bible in 90 Days: Cover to Cover in 12 Pages a Day (The Bible in 90 Days) (Week Three)

Around the Blogosphere:

  • I’d like to thank the following bloggers for following me.

–         Sreejit Poole – Of Mind Or Matter

–          Ruth – The Little Girl Book

My Book Haul: 

  • Holy Bible: Archaeological Study Bible-NIV: An Illustrated Walk Through Biblical History and Culture 
  • Lee Strobel’s The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus 
  • David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas
  • Libba Bray’s The Sweet Far Thing (Gemma Doyle #3)
  • Zondervan’s The Bible in 90 Days: Cover to Cover in 12 Pages a Day (The Bible in 90 Days) (Week Three)

 

Revisited: Fiction Winners!


Flickr CC | Happy Birthday Windows 7 | Photo by tsand

You voted!  Revisited Fiction Results:

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Emma by Jane Austen

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

There was a 3-way tie between a few of the winners. So, these 5 books will be reviewed before the end of 2013!