Dads Rock, Too! A Select Listing for Father’s Day @ Jorie’s Store


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird_(film)

Theatrical release poster – To Kill a Mockingbird | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

As I did for Mother’s Day,  I’m sharing books featuring some of my fathers/father figures in literature. Did your favorite dad make the list?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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Pride and Prejudice  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  A Christmas Carol (Dover Thrift Editions)
A Room with a View  Savvy  To Kill a Mockingbird
Cry, the Beloved Country  Saint Maybe  The Book Thief
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Sarah Addison Allen’s Lost Lake


Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen | Jorie’s Store on Amazon

Lost Lake  
by Sarah Addison Allen
Length: 304 pages
Publisher: St. Martin’s Press
on January 21, 2014 
Genres: Fiction
Source: Harris County Public Library

Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: In 2011, I rapidly read all of Allen’s works I could find. So, when Allen’s newest book came out, I requested it as soon as I could.

Summary: Suley, Georgia is a sleepy, swampy little town near the Florida border. Suley boasts the Lost Lake Cottages run by Eby Pim, an enchanting retreat from the daily grind. After losing her beloved husband, Kate and her free-spirited daughter, Devin, find themselves heading to Lost Lake and the arms of her comforting Aunt Eby (her great aunt, really). Yet, when Kate and Devin arrive, they discover Eby intends to sell Lost Lake. Eby no longer feels the magic. Nonetheless, the Lost Lake Cottages faithful, journey back for one last summer. Kate and Devin stay on, too,  and wait for memorization.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I never considered parts of Georgia to be swampy. Then again, it’s close to Florida! 🙂

What I Liked: I liked Eby and her resilience. Thankfully, I found dashes of the magical realism which make me seek out Allen’s works. Simply, I was grateful to get my hands on another book written by Allen.

What I Disliked: A lot was happening in Lost Lake and I would’ve preferred more of a focus on Eby and Kate’s growing relationship. This just wasn’t Garden Spells or The Girl Who Chased the Moon.

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

 

 

Song: Blind Melon – No Rain

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Moms Rock – New Additions to Jorie’s Store


I am celebrating Mother’s Day by sharing books featuring some of my favorite mothers. Who are your favorite moms in literature?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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In the Name of Salome  The Confessions of Saint Augustine  The Second Summer of the Sisterhood (Sisterhood of Traveling Pants, Book 2)
The Wednesday Daughters: A Novel  Desert Heat (Joanna Brady Mysteries)  Number the Stars
Sarah, Plain and Tall The Godfather  Between Shades of Gray by Sepetys, Ruta 1st (first) Edition [Hardcover(2011)]
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Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Reads – 2014 Edition


Asian Characters | morgueFile Free photos

Last year, I began recognizing various heritage months with a feature called Celebrating Authors. The inaugural section, Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors was a collaborative effort made by Candice P. of warmcuppatea. I managed to recognize two of my favorites – Jhumpa Lahiri and Amy Tan.
While this feature grew to include other author profiles, for 2014, I chose to showcase several books written by those of Asian and/or Pacific descent.
Just like Valentine’s and Easter, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
Samir and Yonatan  The Name Jar  Bindi Babes
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet  How My Parents Learned to Eat (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin books)  Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose
Never Let Me Go  Thousand Cranes  Girl in Translation
Interpreter of Maladies  The Piano Teacher: A Novel  The Ramayana: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic (Penguin Classics)
The Complete Persepolis  The Joy Luck Club  The Arabian Nights (New Deluxe Edition)
Doveglion: Collected Poems (Penguin Classics)  Monkey: Folk Novel of China  Millicent Min, Girl Genius
         

Meg Waite Clayton’s The Wednesday Sisters


The Wednesday Sisters by Meg Waite Clayton | LibraryThing:

Clayton, M. W. (2008). The Wednesday sisters: A novel. New York: Ballantine Books. 9780345502827

Reasons for Reading : After I read The Four Ms. Bradwells, I wanted to read another Meg Waite Clayton book. So, I checked out The Wednesday Sisters at HCPL.

Summary: In the setting of late 1960s Palo Alto, California, five women gather at the park near their homes. Brought to the neighborhood by their husbands’ jobs, Frankie, Linda, Kath, Brett, and Ally begin meeting Wednesday mornings. These ladies differ greatly – the narrator is the meek Chicago Catholic Frankie. She’s awful baffled by blunt, athletic Linda, Kentucky debutante Kath, brilliant Brett who never goes without her white gloves, and secretive Ally. Yet, they’re all readers and closet writers. Thus, at Linda’s urging, the Wednesday Sisters Writing Society is born. Not only do the Wednesday Sisters write, they also support each other throughout the years.

What I Liked:  After I finished this book, I wanted to start my own Wednesday Sisters Writing Socierty. I still adore the idea. Anyone who has asked me for a book recommendation has received this response “Have you read The Wednesday Sisters yet?

Also, I liked that only Frankie narrated. She talked of her attitudes and actions in past events even when they didn’t reflect well on her.

What I Disliked: A few sections, Frankie told of what had happened to other characters in the book. This nearly took on a third person omniscient point of view which seemed unnatural.

Other than Frankie’s husband, Danny, I had a hard time remember which spouse went with each Wednesday Sister.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Paperback Writer – The Beatles

Setting :  Palo Alto California, Hawaii

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Meg Waite Clayton’s The Four Ms. Bradwells


The Four Ms. Bradwells: A Novel | Jorie’s Reads Store @ Amazon

Clayton, M. W. (2011). The four Ms. Bradwells: A novel. New York: Ballantine Books. 9780345517081

Reasons for Reading: As I browsed the Overdrive Digital Media Collection for eAudio, I rediscovered the cover bearing a young woman wearing pearls. Drawn by the cover and the description, I downloaded it to my iPhone. A little ways into listening, I decided I wanted to read the book in the old-fashioned format from HCPL.

Summary: Fifty-something best friends Mia (the Savant), Laney (the Good Girl), Betts (the funny one), and Ginger (the rebel) gather in Washington, DC over a long weekend as Betts awaits Senate confirmation of her appointment to the highest court in the land. Christened “the Ms. Bradwells” in their very first class at Michigan Law in ’79, these four friends have been through it all together – marriage/divorce, birth/death, job promotion/termination.

When Betts seemed all but sworn in as the newest Supreme Court justice, a nasty skeleton peeks out of the closet. This is about that fateful spring break to the summer house on the Chesapeake in ’82. This buried secret rises  to the surface to the point that the Ms. Bradwells can no longer ignore it. Yet, as good friends do, they confront it together.

What I Liked :  I liked that these different, intelligent women remained loyal and true to their friendship. The mystery was compelling and I liked the roles not only played by the Ms. Bradwells but by their mothers. The scenes which took place in Ann Arbor were crystal-clear to me. Then, there was the sense of their daughters carrying on the torch of the Ms. Bradwells.

What I Disliked: One reason I gave up on the audio in favor of the print was because of the narrator. Yes, I realize Laney was from Alabama but did she really have to have her parts read in such an affected accent. Also, the narrator rendered Mia rather whiny. When I switched to the print, I struggled differentiating between the four voices. I was further flummoxed by back-to-back sections narrated by the same character. Another thing which bothered me was that Laney’s mother became a footnote rather than a catalyst of the action. I wanted to know more about her! Before I forget, the pearls described in the novel looked nothing like those on the cover.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: fun.: We Are Young ft. Janelle Monáe [OFFICIAL VIDEO] – YouTube

Setting:  Ann Arbor Michigan, Washington DC, Cook Island

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For more on Meg Waite Clayton’s The Four Ms. Bradwells, check out the following sites: