Back to School Films @ Jorie’s Store


Dead poets society.jpg

Theatrical release poster – Dead Poets Society | Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 With the recent loss of Robin Williams, I recalled one of my favorite films – Dead Poets Society. Surprisingly, this rather literary film wasn’t based on a book. Still, this movie turned me onto “teacher films” as well as to the late Williams’ mad acting skills. In light of all this and the students returning to school soon, I’ve added Dead Poets Society and other inspirational “teacher films” to the store. Let me know what are some of your favorites!
You can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great films. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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Dead Poets Society  To Sir, With Love  Dangerous Minds
   Freedom Writers  Stand and Deliver  Lean on Me (Keep Case Packaging)
  Mr. Holland's Opus  Blackboard Jungle  The Water Is Wide - Hallmark Hall of Fame
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TBTB (Throwback Thursday Books) – Alice Sebold’s The Lovely Bones


The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold | LibraryThing

I originally read Alice Sebold’s The Lovely Bones during Christmas break my senior year of college. The balance between the macabre and whimsy never left me. The distinct point of view (POV) struck me like not much else.

Some years later, I saw a nice, hardcover edition on the shelf among the Friends of Freeman book sale. Then, over Independence Day weekend 2014, I read this book again. Eventually, I checked out the film based on the book.

Reviews of book and the movie both may be coming soon. As this title seems polarizing, comments are most welcome! If you’ve read it, what did you think? If you’ve also seen the movie, what did you think of the interpretation? I’ve got some strong opinions about both.

To read more, click on the Add to Goodreads button below

Goodreads 

For more walks down memory lane, check out my page for #tbtb:

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TBTB (Throwback Thursday Books) – Esther Forbes’ Johnny Tremain


Johnny Tremain by Esther Hoskins Forbes | LibraryThing

Esther Forbes’ Johnny Tremain made my list of Independence Day Reads last week. This tale of 1775 Boston focuses on the titular character, a silversmith apprentice. A life-changing event alters Johnny’s prospects and Johnny must regroup.

Johnny Tremain set on my girlhood bookshelf. I liked that Johnny was an artist and appreciated the mentions of Paul Revere, another silversmith. When Tropical Storm Allison poured on Houston, family friends suffered a lot of property damage. As a bookish college girl, I aimed to rebuild this family’s personal library. Among the donations was my copy of Johnny Tremain.

To read more, click on the Add to Goodreads button below

Goodreads 

For more walks down memory lane, check out my page for #tbtb:

books tbt

Independence Day Reads @ Jorie’s Store


Displays of fireworks, such as these over the Washington Monument, take place across the United States on Independence Day. | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

How better to celebrate Independence Day than to share some topical books? Here’s a little something for every taste and audience. What are your favorite Fourth of July reads?
You can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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Johnny Tremain  Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation  1776
   Hang a Thousand Trees with Ribbons: The Story of Phillis Wheatley (Great Episodes)  April MorningThe First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin
  Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality  Don't Know Much About History, Anniversary Edition: Everything You Need to Know About American History but Never Learned  George Washington's Teeth
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Ann Brashares’ My Name is Memory


My Name is Memory

My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 

Title: My Name is Memory
Author: Ann Brashares
ISBN: 9781594487583
Length: 324 pages
Publication Date: June 01, 2010
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Genre: Historical Fiction, Romance
Source: Harris County Public Library

Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: I came across this title on someone else’s Top Ten Tuesday list back in March. The premise and author Ann Brashares caught my interest. Quickly, I discovered a few copies of My Name is Memory on the shelf at a Harris County Public Library (HCPL) branch and checked out one.

Warning: This is a work of fiction which deals with the subject of reincarnation (past lives). If reincarnation is an offensive topic, please consider yourself warned. 

Summary: Lucy’s crush on the enigmatic Daniel kept her from approaching him. She gathers up courage at the high school graduation dance and approaches Daniel. Little does she know that she and Daniel go way, way back. Unlike most, Daniel recalls each of his past lives. In the first incarnation (that he remembers), Daniel encountered a woman (Lucy) that stole his heart. With each life, Daniel doggedly pursues a seemingly star-crossed love of his lives, the woman who once was called Sophia. Added to a mix is a vengeful brother from that fateful first life who’s after blood. Brashares employs both Daniel’s first person and Lucy/Sophia’s third-person views. This tale of epic proportions begins in 552 AD Asia Minor and carries on through to 1918 England and Twenty-First Century Virginia.

One Thing I Learned from this book: There was an earthquake in AD 526. To learn more about it, visit the following, linked phrase – 526 Antioch Earthquake – Wikipedia

What I Liked: As a historical fiction fan, I enjoyed the passages set in the past. I especially liked reading about events in the First Millennium AD. Also, Brashares’ characters in this book differed greatly from those in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series. While I enjoyed reading about Carmen, Lena, Tibby, and Bridget, I appreciate Brashares’ originality in character formation.

What I Disliked: I refuse to spoil the ending but I hope Brashares can write the other books planned involving Daniel and Lucy.

RR - Orange

Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 

 

Song: Nat King Cole, Unforgettable

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Dads Rock, Too! A Select Listing for Father’s Day @ Jorie’s Store


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird_(film)

Theatrical release poster – To Kill a Mockingbird | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

As I did for Mother’s Day,  I’m sharing books featuring some of my fathers/father figures in literature. Did your favorite dad make the list?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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Pride and Prejudice  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  A Christmas Carol (Dover Thrift Editions)
A Room with a View  Savvy  To Kill a Mockingbird
Cry, the Beloved Country  Saint Maybe  The Book Thief
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Deborah Johnson’s The Secret of Magic


The Secret of Magic

The Secret of Magic by Deborah Johnson | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 

Title: The Secret of Magic
Author: Deborah Johnson
ISBN: 9780399157721
Length: 416 pages
Publication Date: January 21, 2014
Publisher: Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam
Genre: Historical Fiction
Source: Harris County Public Library

Goodreads

 Reasons for Reading: I either heard about or read something referring to this 2014 release. Given that we were planning a library program about African American History Month, I sought and requested this book via Harris County Public Library (HCPL).

Summary: Decorated African American World War II hero Joe Howard Wilson took the bus home to his native Revere, Mississippi. When expected to give up his seat for German POWs, Joe Howard refused. Later on, Joe Howard’s body is found. Fast forward to the Fall 1946 New York, the reader meets Regina Mary Robichard, a young attorney working for Thurgood Marshall at the NAACP. Regina discovers a letter from writer of the notorious The Secret of Magic, M.P. Calhoun, has called upon the NAACP for help in bringing Joe Howard’s killer to justice. With her childhood copy of The Secret of Magic practically in hand, Regina journeys down to Revere in order to discover what happened to Joe Howard.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Thurgood Marshall’s wife was called “Buster.” To learn more about the late Justice Marshall, click on the following link – Marshall, Thurgood – Facts on File History Database

What I Liked: Regina is an African American woman who was also an attorney. Author Deborah Johnson’s inspiration was Constance Baker Motley. I liked the tidbits about Marshall, too. Johnson’s writing is vivid and rich. Already, I was imagining who should play Regina, M.P. Calhoun, Joe Howard, and Marshall in the movie.

What I Disliked: A few parts dragged for me but this didn’t much eclipse my appreciation of the book.

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

 

Song: Cristine and Kathrine Shipp – Sea Lion Woman

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