7th Birthday Week Summary!


Flickr CC | Happy Birthday Windows 7 | Photo by tsand

Flickr CC | Happy Birthday Windows 7 | Photo by tsand

 

This past week, Jorie’s Reads celebrated by:

  1. Posting 7 Book Reviews
  2. The Introduction of Revisited Nonfiction
  3. Taking on the Challenge of Revisited Fiction
  4. Sharing A Top 7 Tuesday
  5. Visiting 7 new book blogs
  6. Commenting on 7 different blogs
  7. Reading 7 Bible verses 🙂
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H. Joaquin Jackson & David Marion Wilkinson’s One Ranger: A Memoir


One Ranger: A Memoir (Bridwell Texas History Series) by H. Joaquin Jackson | LibraryThing

Jackson, H. J., Wilkinson, D. M., & Linn, R. (2005). One ranger: A memoir. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks. 9780786179978

Reasons for Reading: Once again, I browsed for eAudio. As I usually prefer hearing nonfiction, I perused biographies when I spotted One Ranger: A Memoir. I scanned the description and decided to listen to the memoir during my work commute. I uploaded the eAudio to my iPhone from HCPL’s Digital Media Catalog.

Summary: Like many other boys who grew up in Twentieth Century Texas, Joaquin Jackson dreamed of becoming part of the legendary Texas Rangers. The 6 foot 5 inch Jackson’s dream came true in 1966. Jackson embarked on a career which led him to many adventures, friendships, and fame. His picture graced the cover of Texas Monthly (see the book cover :)), he gained bit parts in movies with the likes of Tommy Lee Jones, and Nick Nolte even modeled his character in the movie Extreme Prejudice after him. Of course, Jackson experienced many points of heartache as well.

What I Liked: I enjoyed Jackson’s sense of humor throughout his memoir. Also, I thought Rex Linn was the perfect choice to narrate this work. I nearly thought Linn was Jackson himself. Soon after I began listening to One Ranger, I got a mention from UT Press on Twitter and that was awesome!

What I Disliked:  I believe this error was due to the download but one chapter didn’t properly work. I had to check out the print version and read what happened. Also, a sequel – One Ranger Returns – exists but it’s not in eAudio format. I hope this changes soon.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Setting: Texas

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 For more on H. Joaquin Jackson & David Marion Wilkinson’s One Ranger: A Memoir, check out the following:

Ron Hall & Denver Moore’s What Difference Do It Make?…


What Difference Do It Make?: Stories of Hope and Healing by Ron Hall | LibraryThing

Hall, R., Moore, D., & Vincent, L. (2009). What difference do it make?: Stories of hope and healing. Nashville, Tenn: Thomas Nelson. 9780849920196

Reasons for Reading: After reading Same Kind of Different as Me for our Bible Study group, my mom found this sequel of sorts.  She checked out What difference do it make?: Stories of hope and healing from HCPL and recommended I read it, too.

Summary: (Warning: Must Read Same Kind of Different As Me… before starting this book.) What Difference Do It Make… is a collection of stories and events which were spurred on by Same Kind of Different as Me.

What I Liked: It was great finding out that a single book led to so many awesome acts. Also, I appreciated the authenticity of it. These people had problems and they didn’t shy away from admitting them.

What I Disliked:  Why couldn’t Same Kind of Different as Me have been this awesome?

Four Out of Five Pearls

 
Setting: Dallas, Ft. Worth, Louisiana, Italy, United States 
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 For more on Ron Hall & Denver Moore’s Same Kind of Different as Me…, check out the following:

Meg Waite Clayton’s The Wednesday Sisters


The Wednesday Sisters by Meg Waite Clayton | LibraryThing:

Clayton, M. W. (2008). The Wednesday sisters: A novel. New York: Ballantine Books. 9780345502827

Reasons for Reading : After I read The Four Ms. Bradwells, I wanted to read another Meg Waite Clayton book. So, I checked out The Wednesday Sisters at HCPL.

Summary: In the setting of late 1960s Palo Alto, California, five women gather at the park near their homes. Brought to the neighborhood by their husbands’ jobs, Frankie, Linda, Kath, Brett, and Ally begin meeting Wednesday mornings. These ladies differ greatly – the narrator is the meek Chicago Catholic Frankie. She’s awful baffled by blunt, athletic Linda, Kentucky debutante Kath, brilliant Brett who never goes without her white gloves, and secretive Ally. Yet, they’re all readers and closet writers. Thus, at Linda’s urging, the Wednesday Sisters Writing Society is born. Not only do the Wednesday Sisters write, they also support each other throughout the years.

What I Liked:  After I finished this book, I wanted to start my own Wednesday Sisters Writing Socierty. I still adore the idea. Anyone who has asked me for a book recommendation has received this response “Have you read The Wednesday Sisters yet?

Also, I liked that only Frankie narrated. She talked of her attitudes and actions in past events even when they didn’t reflect well on her.

What I Disliked: A few sections, Frankie told of what had happened to other characters in the book. This nearly took on a third person omniscient point of view which seemed unnatural.

Other than Frankie’s husband, Danny, I had a hard time remember which spouse went with each Wednesday Sister.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Paperback Writer – The Beatles

Setting :  Palo Alto California, Hawaii

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For more on Meg Waite Clayton’s The Wednesday Sisters , check out the following sites:
 

Meg Waite Clayton’s The Four Ms. Bradwells


The Four Ms. Bradwells: A Novel | Jorie’s Reads Store @ Amazon

Clayton, M. W. (2011). The four Ms. Bradwells: A novel. New York: Ballantine Books. 9780345517081

Reasons for Reading: As I browsed the Overdrive Digital Media Collection for eAudio, I rediscovered the cover bearing a young woman wearing pearls. Drawn by the cover and the description, I downloaded it to my iPhone. A little ways into listening, I decided I wanted to read the book in the old-fashioned format from HCPL.

Summary: Fifty-something best friends Mia (the Savant), Laney (the Good Girl), Betts (the funny one), and Ginger (the rebel) gather in Washington, DC over a long weekend as Betts awaits Senate confirmation of her appointment to the highest court in the land. Christened “the Ms. Bradwells” in their very first class at Michigan Law in ’79, these four friends have been through it all together – marriage/divorce, birth/death, job promotion/termination.

When Betts seemed all but sworn in as the newest Supreme Court justice, a nasty skeleton peeks out of the closet. This is about that fateful spring break to the summer house on the Chesapeake in ’82. This buried secret rises  to the surface to the point that the Ms. Bradwells can no longer ignore it. Yet, as good friends do, they confront it together.

What I Liked :  I liked that these different, intelligent women remained loyal and true to their friendship. The mystery was compelling and I liked the roles not only played by the Ms. Bradwells but by their mothers. The scenes which took place in Ann Arbor were crystal-clear to me. Then, there was the sense of their daughters carrying on the torch of the Ms. Bradwells.

What I Disliked: One reason I gave up on the audio in favor of the print was because of the narrator. Yes, I realize Laney was from Alabama but did she really have to have her parts read in such an affected accent. Also, the narrator rendered Mia rather whiny. When I switched to the print, I struggled differentiating between the four voices. I was further flummoxed by back-to-back sections narrated by the same character. Another thing which bothered me was that Laney’s mother became a footnote rather than a catalyst of the action. I wanted to know more about her! Before I forget, the pearls described in the novel looked nothing like those on the cover.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: fun.: We Are Young ft. Janelle Monáe [OFFICIAL VIDEO] – YouTube

Setting:  Ann Arbor Michigan, Washington DC, Cook Island

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For more on Meg Waite Clayton’s The Four Ms. Bradwells, check out the following sites:

Jodi Picoult & Samantha van Leer’s Between the Lines


Between the Lines by Jodi Picoult & Samantha van Leer | LibraryThing

Picoult, J., & Leer, S. . (2012). Between the lines. New York: Simon Pulse/Emily Bestler Books/Atria. 9781451635751

Reasons for Reading: I attended the American Library Association Annual Conference last summer where I saw authors Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer. This mother and daughter team wrote a book called Between the Lines which sounded very different from any other Picoult book I knew. When I returned to Houston, my mom and I requested this book from HCPL.

Summary: Quiet high school loner Delilah would rather read than contend with her fellow students. This is how she becomes immersed in the fairy tale “Between the Lines.” Delilah falls in love with the valiant hero, Prince Oliver. It’s as though he’s real!

Then, Prince Oliver DOES speak to Delilah. He’s a teenage actor confined to a storybook. More than anything, Prince Oliver wants to escape and live in the very real world of living, breathing love  – Delilah.  

So, these two work together so they can exist in the same world.

 What I Liked: The concept was awesomely original! I liked reading the pieces of “Between the Lines” as well as the perspectives of Delilah and Prince Oliver.  I appreciated the collaboration of the authors as well as the characters within the book. Lastly, the illustrations were beautiful.

What I Disliked: Without spoiling the end, I felt it was a little rushed. On the whole, I was satisfied with the conclusion but I found it bittersweet.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Plain White T’s – “Hey There Delilah” – YouTube

Places : United States

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For more on Jodi Picoult & Samantha van Leer’s Between the Lines, check out the following sites:

Happy 7th Birthday, Jorie’s Reads!


Flickr CC | Happy Birthday Windows 7 | Photo by tsand

Flickr CC | Happy Birthday Windows 7 | Photo by tsand

Just 7 years ago today, Jorie’s Reads took its first breath. In 7 years, Jorie’s Reads has:

  • Read 236 Books
  • Posted 388 Times
  • Created 10 Pages
  • Approved 578 Comments
  • Been viewed 21, 781 times
  • Read 236 Books
  • Interviewed 12 Readers of the Month

This week, Jorie’s Reads celebrates by:

  1. Posting 7 Book Reviews
  2. The Introduction of Revisited Nonfiction
  3. Taking on the Challenge of Revisited Fiction
  4. Sharing A Top 7 Tuesday
  5. Visiting 7 new book blogs
  6. Commenting on 7 different blogs
  7. Reading 7 Bible verses 🙂