Kass Morgan’s The 100


The 100 (The 100 Series)

The 100 (The 100 Series) by Kass Morgan | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 

Title: The 100
Author: Kass Morgan
ISBN: 978-0316234474
Length: 336 pages
Publication Date: September 3, 2013
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Genre: Science Fiction
Source: Harris County Public Library

Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: I heard about the upcoming series on The CW. While I normally read the books before I see the movie, I often do the reverse when it comes to TV shows. However, I held out on the show with Kass Morgan’s The 100. Also, I broke my own rule about reading a series before the author finished the series. Thus, I checked out this first book from HCPL.

Summary: (A little background) In a bleak future, humans dwell in ships which orbit a practically abandoned planet Earth. Earth may still have too much radiation for humans to live on it. Due to limited space and dwindling resources, draconian laws rule the day. It’s unclear whether people are permitted to procreate or if they’re limited to just one child. Also, even among the ships, there are “better neighborhoods.” Apparently slight infractions incur the death penalty (known as “being floated”) for adults. Minors await their eighteenth birthdays, trial, and much the same penalty.

 (Story Time) However, push has come to shove. Clarke, the first of four points of view (POV) offered in The 100, finds herself being dragged from solitary confinement to board a ship headed for Earth. The grown ups have decided to send a hundred juvenile delinquents to Earth to test the waters. If these kiddos can make it, then the humans may try to “go home.” The daughter of floated scientists, Clarke has minimal training in medicine. Other POVs come from ex-boyfriend Wells, the son of the chancellor, and Bellamy, a risk-taker who will do anything to protect his ill-gotten little sister, Octavia. These two manipulated their way onto the Earthbound ship but the last POV, a girl named Glass, snuck off the ship. All four POVs face the same question: survival.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I learned what sort of society I wouldn’t want to live in if Earth fell to radioactive ruin. 🙂

What I Liked: Unlike many other reviewers, I appreciated all four POVs. When I tired of one’s angle, a new chapter and POV began. I liked the scenes where characters rediscovered Earth.

What I Disliked: I usually appreciate flashbacks but I found them tedious after a while. Another thing that irked was the cliffhanger ending. I completely expected it but was still disappointed by the cliché of it. Also, lines such as “The first kiss on Earth in centuries” were gagging. Lastly, I wanted more description of the setting.

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

Song: From Myself – Paul Hovermale

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Jodi Picoult & Samantha van Leer’s Between the Lines


Between the Lines by Jodi Picoult & Samantha van Leer | LibraryThing

Picoult, J., & Leer, S. . (2012). Between the lines. New York: Simon Pulse/Emily Bestler Books/Atria. 9781451635751

Reasons for Reading: I attended the American Library Association Annual Conference last summer where I saw authors Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer. This mother and daughter team wrote a book called Between the Lines which sounded very different from any other Picoult book I knew. When I returned to Houston, my mom and I requested this book from HCPL.

Summary: Quiet high school loner Delilah would rather read than contend with her fellow students. This is how she becomes immersed in the fairy tale “Between the Lines.” Delilah falls in love with the valiant hero, Prince Oliver. It’s as though he’s real!

Then, Prince Oliver DOES speak to Delilah. He’s a teenage actor confined to a storybook. More than anything, Prince Oliver wants to escape and live in the very real world of living, breathing love  – Delilah.  

So, these two work together so they can exist in the same world.

 What I Liked: The concept was awesomely original! I liked reading the pieces of “Between the Lines” as well as the perspectives of Delilah and Prince Oliver.  I appreciated the collaboration of the authors as well as the characters within the book. Lastly, the illustrations were beautiful.

What I Disliked: Without spoiling the end, I felt it was a little rushed. On the whole, I was satisfied with the conclusion but I found it bittersweet.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Plain White T’s – “Hey There Delilah” – YouTube

Places : United States

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Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez’s Haters


Haters by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez | LibraryThing

Valdes-Rodriguez, A., & Parker, J. (2006). Haters. Prince Frederick, MD: Recorded Books. 9781428122031

Reasons for Reading Right before Easter break, I needed a short audiobook to keep me company on my way home from work. That’s when I noticed Haters on the shelf in the Teen Zone. So, I checked it out from HCPL.

Summary High schooler Pasquala Rumalda Quintana de Archuleta (“Paski”) lives with her graphic artist father in Taos, New Mexico. Nearby lives her grandma, a well-to-do psychic who communicates with the dead. Paski rides her mountain bike, hangs out with her best friend, and just began dating the cutest guy. Then, her dad drops the bomb; Hollywood picked up his graphic novels for movies and they’re moving to California. This news makes Paski miserable. Adding to her agony, Paski falls for the hottest guy at her new school, Chris Cabrera. He just happens to date Jessica Nguyen, the reigning queen of the Haters. To top it off, Paski must also deal with her own psychic abilities.

What I Liked: The fact that this was Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez’s first young adult novel left me amazed. She created identifiable characters, particularly Paski, and such a rich understanding of teen life. I completely believed the portrayal of her dad, too.

What I Disliked I absolutely loathe “abridgements.” Once I realized the audio happened to be such, I asked myself if I had truly read the book. Then, I requested the print edition and found several details didn’t make it onto the CDs. Seriously, abridged books should be illegal.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: GWEN STEFANI – RICH GIRL VIDEO – OFFICIAL – YouTube

Setting : Taos New Mexico, Orange County California

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Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower


The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky | LibraryThing

Chbosky, S. (1999). The perks of being a wallflower. New York: Pocket Books. 9780671027346

Reasons for Reading : The first time I heard about The Perks of Being a Wallflower was in library school. Stephen Chbosky’s work was banned by the Library Patrons of Texas. I hadn’t thought much about it until I saw that a movie based on the book would come out later in 2012. Thus, I requested and checked out the book from HCPL.

Summary : Assuming the alias “Charlie,” a troubled high school freshman writes letters to an unnamed friend, starting in the 1991. Through these rather intimate letters, Charlie describes his family, his teacher Bill who assigns extra essays to write, his senior friends, Patrick and Sam[antha], and his late Aunt Helen.

What I Liked : Nothing was sugarcoated in this book. Actually, it was pretty raw stuff. The characters were original and realistic.

What I Disliked : Maybe it was necessary for Chbosky to set this in the early 1990s. Yet, it would’ve appealed more if it had been set around the time it was published – 1999. Also, I somber read and not for those looking for some gentle literature.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: The Smiths – Asleep – YouTube

Setting : Pittsburgh, PA

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Rachel Cohn and David Levithan’s Nick & Norah’s infinite playlist


Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist by Rachel Cohn | LibraryThing

Cohn, R., & Levithan, D. (2006). Nick & Norah’s infinite playlist. New York: Knopf. 9780375835315

Reasons for Reading : Okay, as a music lover, I couldn’t pass up an opportunity to read a book about other music lovers. I requested Nick & Norah’s infinite playlist through HCPL.

Summary : Nick sees his ex-girlfriend heading his way at a concert. He turns to the girl next to him, Norah, and asks her “Will you be my girlfriend for the next five minutes?” Thus, the adventure of Nick and Norah begins.

What I Liked : The idea of a five minute relationship has potential for a great novel. Mostly, Cohn and Levithan navigated this concept well.

I appreciated how Cohn wrote from Norah’s point of view while Levithan handled Nick’s angle. Also, I liked that Cohn wrote the part of the female character and left the male character to Levithan.

It was cool seeing how Nick’s bandmate came through for him, too.

What I Disliked :  While I know a few things about music, I barely knew of the existence of “queer core.” Also, I didn’t like the dig at Weezer.

I doubt Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist would be good for the less mature teenager. There’s lots of cussing (i.e. the name of Nick’s band) and sexual situations.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: (Where’s Fluffy Music) – Last Words – YouTube

Setting : New York City

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Top Ten Books I Read Because Of Another Blogger


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

September 13: Top Ten Books I Read Because Of Another Blogger (In honor of BBAW!)

(These are books that were recommended by friends, family, colleagues, and library patrons as well as bloggers.

1. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins – (The Broke and the Bookish)

2. The Luxe Series by Anna Godbersen – (Colleague)

3. Beth Revis’ Across the Universe series – (Colleague)

4. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins – (Colleagues)

5. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows – (Friend)

6. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson – (Family)

7. The Virgin Blue by Tracy Chevalier – (Friend)

8. The Shack by William P. Young – (Family)

9. The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich –  (Friend)

10. Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen – (Neal Wyatt/ Library Journal)   

Top Ten Sequels Jorie’s Dying to Read


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

September 6: Top Ten Sequels Jorie’s Dying to Read

1. V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton – I began reading the first Kinsey Milhone last week and it’s addictive.

2. Beautiful Days by Anna Godbersen – Sometimes, I wish I’d waited until all the books were published before reading the first. I may need to review Bright Young Things.

3. The Next Book in Beth Revis’ Across the Universe series – I’m happy there’s more that Revis has to say but I want it five minutes ago.

4. Whatever Sarah Dessen publishes next – Not a series but she drops enough Easter eggs that it’s always good to read these in the order they’re published.

5. Persepolis III by Marjane Satrapi – Yes, it’s out there but not in English.

6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson – Actually, I’m reading it right now. However, I put aside a few other books just to finish the Millennium Trilogy.

7. Aurora Teagarden Series by Charlaine Harris – Okay, I’ve not read one of these. Nonetheless, my mom picked up the first one and it definitely qualifies for my TBR. Unfortunately, Harris has shelved these as she writes more Sookie Stackhouse novels.

8. The Robert Langdon books by Dan Brown – While these books aren’t my favorites, I do like the random facts within each volume.

9. The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich – I haven’t kept up with Ms. Plum in a while but I hear she’s making her between Morelli and Ranger public in the next one.

10. The Case for Christ series by Lee Strobel – I need to read all of these.