Top Ten Most Popular Authors on Jorie’s Bookshelf


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

top ten authors we own the most books of

(Normally, I prefer borrowing to buying books. Nonetheless, I own books I’ve seen on sale at the Friends of Freeman Bookstore.)

(Thank you, Goodreads, for the images of the following authors.)

1. Julia Alvarez

Julia Álvarez

2. Sandra Brown

Sandra Brown

3. Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton

4. Jeffrey Eugenides

http://www.bookpage.com/the-book-case/2011/02/09/jeffrey-eugenides-and-the-marriage-plot/

5. Katherine Howe

Katherine Howe

6. Stephen King

Stephen King

7. Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver

7. Alan Paton

Alan Paton

8. William Shakespeare

The Chandos portrait of famous writer</p>
<p>http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/britons/briton3.htm

9. Lee Strobel

Lee Strobel

10. Bruce Wilkinson

Bruce Wilkinson

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Dads Rock, Too! A Select Listing for Father’s Day @ Jorie’s Store


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird_(film)

Theatrical release poster – To Kill a Mockingbird | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

As I did for Mother’s Day,  I’m sharing books featuring some of my fathers/father figures in literature. Did your favorite dad make the list?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
~~~~~
Pride and Prejudice  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  A Christmas Carol (Dover Thrift Editions)
A Room with a View  Savvy  To Kill a Mockingbird
Cry, the Beloved Country  Saint Maybe  The Book Thief
~~~~~
     

John Howard Griffin’s Black Like Me


Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin | LibraryThing

(Last book review of books finished in 2012!)

Griffin, J. H., & Childs, R. (2004). Black like me. Middletown, Me.: Audio Bookshelf, LLC.

Reasons for Reading:Yet again, I sought another nonfiction eAudio work to entertain me during my work commute. I came across Black Like Me, checked it out from the HCPL Digital Media Catalog, and put it on my iPhone.

Summary: Texas Writer John Howard Griffin underwent a bold experiment like no other. He left his home in Mansfield, Texas with the intent to “pass as black.” With the help of a reticent New Orleans dermatologist, Griffin took a course of drugs, endured sunlamp treatments, and applied skin creams in order to understand the “black experience” firsthand. He also shaved his head and, later, his arms.

Then, he traveled through the Deep South as a black man. His social experiment altered the lives of many. Black Like Me is a journal of Griffin’s courageous experiment. The title comes from Langston Hughes’ “Dream Variations”

Rest at pale evening…

A tall slim tree…

Night coming tenderly

Black like me.

What I Liked: I appreciated what Griffin did. Also, I found Griffin to be a gifted writer who wanted to understand and help his fellow citizens. I liked that Griffin didn’t lie, either. He seemed to be an interesting and virtuous man.

What I Disliked:  Many versions of this book exist. I’m grateful I got an edition with an epilogue which Griffin wrote in the 1970s. As hindsight is 20/20, Griffin related the outcome of Black Like Me. It’s my feeling that this should be the version everyone reads.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Setting: Texas, New Orleans, Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina

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 For more on John Howard Griffin’s Black Like Me, check out the following:

June 14: Top Ten “Awww” Moments In Books (those cute lines, charming actions, kisses, or any other sentimental moment that made you say “AWWW!”


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

June 14: Top Ten “Awww” Moments In Books (those cute lines, charming actions, kisses, or any other sentimental moment that made you say “AWWW!”

I’ve listed titles only since I don’t want to reveal endings of books – the “Awww!” moments in these books. I welcome comments. 🙂

1. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen

2. Eat, pray, love: [one woman’s search for everything across Italy, India and Indonesia] by Elizabeth Gilbert

3. Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

4. Just Listen by Sarah Dessen

5. Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason by Helen Fielding

6. The Graduate by Charles Webb

7. Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen

8. A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks

9. Miss Pettigrew Lives for the Day by Winifred Watson

10. No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith

Top Ten Inspirational Characters | Top Ten Tuesday


 

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

 
 
THE TOPIC FOR NEXT WEEK IS:  Top Ten Books I Wished I Read as a Kid. Check out future TTT topics.

 
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

This week, The Broke and the Bookish challenged readers to choose their Top Ten Inspirational Characters. Since the term “characters” is used, I’m only listing made up or fictionalized characters. Spoiler Alerts!

1. Atticus Finch of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee – Atticus Finch is an attorney in Depression-Era Alabama. When black man Tom Robinson is accused of raping Mayella Ewell, Finch represents Robinson. It’s apparent that Robinson has been falsely accused but Finch’s case is hard to prove thanks to the bigotry of the day. Nevertheless, Finch does not back down from defending his client.

2. Antonia Shimerda of My Antonia by Willa Cather – This beauty of Bohemia immigrates with her family and settles in Nebraska. She both works and plays hard. Nothing tanks Antonia.

3. James Jarvis of Cry, The Beloved Country by Alan Paton – James Jarvis is a wealthy South African landowner. His son, Arthur, was an engineer and an activist for racial justice. James learns of his son’s death at the hands of black thieves. Yet, James picks up where Arthur left off in his cause for the end of Apartheid.

4. Patria Mirabal of In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez – The Mirabal family lives in The Dominican Republic under the rule of Trujillo. The Mirabals have four daughters: Patria, Dede, Minerva, and Maria Teresa. The oldest of the Mirabal sisters, Patria is very religious. She and her husband, Pedrito, have a very solid marriage and family life. Patria is also a revolutionary, starting a Christian revolutionary group and merging it with her sister Minerva’s revolutionary group. Ultimately, she loses everything for the cause of her country.

5. Sydney Carton of A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens – Mr. Carton is a young English barrister that doesn’t live up to his potential. He falls in love with the pure, golden, French Lucie Manette.  This is unrequited, though, because Lucie’s heart belongs to her husband, Charles Darney, also Carton’s doppelganger. D Darney once was a French aristocrat but, on the brink of Revolution, is about to be executed. However, Carton steps in for Darney, saying “It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”

6. Sergeant McShane of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith – Michael McShane is a policeman turned politician. He is married to a sickly woman but admires widow Katie Rommely Nolan, protagonist Francie’s mother, from afar. McShane remains faithful to his wife until her death does them part. Then, he proposes to Katie. Katie accepts. McShane takes care of not only Katie but her three children by her late husband.

7. Cordelia of King Lear by William Shakespeare – Cordelia is the youngest daughter of King Lear. When her awful sisters, Goneril and Regan, shamelessly flatter their father so they can inherit part of his estate, Cordelia doesn’t play. For this reason, King Lear disowns his virtuous daughter.

8. Jane Eyre of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë – Jane survives a childhood of depravity with her character in tact. She perseveres through the ups and downs of a relationship with Mr. Rochester. Jane also refuses to marry for any other reason than love.

9. Claudius of I, Claudius and Claudius the God by Robert Graves– In these two books, Claudius relates the story of his life. He started out as a lame child, mostly ignored for this reason. After the death of Caligua, Claudius is crowned emperor. The sheer survival of Claudius alone inspires.

10. Delia and James “Jim” Dillingham Young of “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry – Here’s a man willing to sacrifice for the happiness of his wife. Also, we’ve got a woman willing to sacrifice for the happiness of her husband. Don’t I just love irony?

11. Jesus Christ

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!