Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors!


Asian Characters | morgueFile Free photos 

As the U.S. Government sees it,

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month – a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian-Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island).

So, why not recognize a few of my favorite authors of this heritage? So, coming soon, Jorie’s Reads will share profiles on:

  1. Jhumpa Lahiri
  2. Amy Tan
  3. Jamie Ford

Who are your favorites?

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Jean Kwok’s Girl in Translation (Uncorrected Proof)


Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok | LibraryThing

Kwok, J. (2010). Girl in translation. (Uncorrected Proof).  New York: Riverhead Books. 9781594487569

When I attended a meeting at HCPL’s Administrative Office, many uncorrected proofs awaited new readers. I picked up half a dozen that day, including Girl in Translation. As I didn’t want to lose a library book between here and England, I took Girl in Translation with me.

Kimberly Chang and her mother leave behind Hong Kong to pursue the American Dream sometime in the 1980s. Since they know very little English, the Changs depend on Kimberly’s Aunt Paula. Aunt Paula installs them in a Brooklyn slum and in her sweatshop. Soon, Kimberly leads two lives – stellar student by day and Chinatown sweatshop worker in the evenings. She struggles through squalor, deprivation, and a crushing crush on an underachieving boy at the factory; Kimberly also navigates the social strata in a preppy white world. Bridging cultural and generational gaps, Kimberly must be strong to “make it.”

Kwok clearly draws her characters, especially Kimberly and her mother. My favorite character was Mrs. Chang because she was an empathetic person. I despised Aunt Paula. Another amusing thing Kwok writes is how Kimberly hears certain English words. I won’t remark on what Kimberly actually asked her teacher for when she needed an eraser.

What I didn’t like about this story was the ending. Most of all, what happened to Kimberly’s best friend Annette in the conclusion? I missed Annette because I considered her an impetus in Kimberly’s education. While I found the deprivation believable, I couldn’t buy some of the other things. I’m sad to say I really didn’t enjoy this book.

Two Out of Five Pearls

Song: Spin Doctors – Two Princes – YouTube

Places : Hong Kong, New York City,

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