Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society


The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer | LibraryThing

Shaffer, M. A., & Barrows, A. (2008). The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. New York, N.Y: The Dial Press. 9780385340991

One friend of mine noticed this most curious title on the NYT Bestsellers list. The name compelled her to request the book via HCPL and read it. She recommended it highly for two years. So, this summer, I requested it myself. The book was a collaborative effort between the late Mary Ann Shaffer and her niece Annie Barrows.

Shaffer and Barrows tell their tale through correspondence; this is an epistolary novel. The letters begin in early 1946. London writer Juliet Ashton receives a letter from Dawsey Adams from the Channel Islands, Guernsey to be exact. Dawsey is the current owner of a Charles Lamb book which once belonged to Juliet. Their correspondence leads to discussion of the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, a book club which met on Guernsey Island during the German Occupation. Through many letters, Juliet discovers the light of literature and new friends.

While I felt the book slow in the beginning, I soon found myself riveted. I enjoyed several of the characters and I loved how the authors allowed the characters to speak for themselves. Juliet was my favorite character. At a point fairly early in the book, Juliet requests references from two people – a man who will sing her praises and a woman who will expose all of Juliet’s warts. Juliet’s spirit leapt from the pages. While this takes place after World War II in England, negativity and bleakness are part of the picture. However, these people rise above this and look forward to their brighter futures. 

So, when’s the movie coming to a theater near me?

Four of Five Pearls

Song: ‪Mr Postman – the Marvelettes High Quality‬‏ – YouTube

Setting : Guernsey, Channel Islands, London, England, France, Germany

You might also like:

  •  Atonement by Ian McEwan
  • The Reader by Bernhard Schlink
  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
  • Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary

For more on Shaffer and Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, please check out the following links:

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Top Ten Rebels In Literature (characters or authors) | The Broke and the Bookish


Hope everyone had a great holiday! I came home last night, after a relaxing weekend on the beach, to start working on Top Ten Tuesday for today and my computer was acting all wonky..thus I could not get on it to get this ready for today.

So there will be no list from us today but I’m dropping by on my lunch break to put up the Mr. Linky real quick so you all can enjoy each other’s lists!

To see upcoming Top Ten Tuesday’s, please click HERE!

July 5: Top Ten Rebels In Literature (characters or authors) — Those people who stood up for what they believed in despite the cost of doing so.

Authors

  1. Thomas Jefferson, writer of the “Declaration of Independence”
  2. Nikos Kazantzakis, writer of The Last Temptation of Christ
  3. Marjane Satrapi, writer of Persepolis
  4. Betty Friedan, writer of The Feminine Mystique
  5. Rachel Carson, writer of Silent Spring

Characters

  1. The Mirabal sisters of Julia Alvarez’s In the Time of the Butterflies – These real-life heroines stood up for the Dominican Republic and its villainous dictator – Trujillo.
  2. Howard Roark of Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead – Perhaps the most uncompromising rebel, Roark would do things his way only.
  3. Elizabeth McKenna of Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society – Just read the book, you’ll understand what I’m saying.
  4. Atticus Finch of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird – See previous response.
  5. Cinna of Sue Collins’ The Hunger Games – While Katniss is obvious, Cinna was the impetus. Many others have blogged this as well.