Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month


Asian Characters | morgueFile Free photos

The U.S. celebrates Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM) in May. In honor of this celebration, I collected books with APAHM-related themes as well as authors of Asian-Pacific heritage. Check out my 2014 shelfie. What books deserve a spot on the shelf?
You can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
Samir and Yonatan  The Name Jar  Bindi Babes
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet  How My Parents Learned to Eat (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin books)  Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose
Never Let Me Go  Thousand Cranes  Girl in Translation
Interpreter of Maladies  The Piano Teacher: A Novel  The Ramayana: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic (Penguin Classics)
The Complete Persepolis  The Joy Luck Club  The Arabian Nights (New Deluxe Edition)
Doveglion: Collected Poems (Penguin Classics)  Monkey: Folk Novel of China  Millicent Min, Girl Genius
         

Blog Ahead (mini)

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Reads – 2014 Edition


Asian Characters | morgueFile Free photos

Last year, I began recognizing various heritage months with a feature called Celebrating Authors. The inaugural section, Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors was a collaborative effort made by Candice P. of warmcuppatea. I managed to recognize two of my favorites – Jhumpa Lahiri and Amy Tan.
While this feature grew to include other author profiles, for 2014, I chose to showcase several books written by those of Asian and/or Pacific descent.
Just like Valentine’s and Easter, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
Samir and Yonatan  The Name Jar  Bindi Babes
Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet  How My Parents Learned to Eat (Sandpiper Houghton Mifflin books)  Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose
Never Let Me Go  Thousand Cranes  Girl in Translation
Interpreter of Maladies  The Piano Teacher: A Novel  The Ramayana: A Shortened Modern Prose Version of the Indian Epic (Penguin Classics)
The Complete Persepolis  The Joy Luck Club  The Arabian Nights (New Deluxe Edition)
Doveglion: Collected Poems (Penguin Classics)  Monkey: Folk Novel of China  Millicent Min, Girl Genius
         

Jorie’s Top Ten Authors of Asian-Pacific Descent


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

top ten tuesday freebie! 

(Since it’s the last week of National Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, I’m listing my ten favorite authors of Asian-Pacific descent – whether or not they’re “American.” So, I present these fine folks in the order they occurred to me.)

  1. Jhumpa Lahiri
  2. Amy Tan
  3. Jamie Ford
  4. Marjane Satrapi
  5. Ina Friedman
  6. Yangsook Choi
  7. Lisa Yee
  8. Narinder Dhami
  9. Tony Hsieh

National Asian Pacific American Heritage Month – Amy Tan


Amy Tan | LibraryThing

This post is part of a feature at Jorie’s Reads called “Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors! that Candice P. of WarmCuppaTea and I are doing this May.

I recall going with my mom and her friends to see The Joy Luck Club which was based on Amy Tan’s bestselling novel of the same name. While I heard afterwards that the movie greatly differed from the book which inspired it, I looked forward to reading the book someday. Later on, as I read Tan’s books, I became riveted by these relationships. Tan really shines when it comes to rendering a portrait of the mother-daughter relationship.

As the Literature Resource Center says:

Novelist Amy Tan was born in 1952, in Oakland, California, to Chinese immigrant parents. Her father, John Tan, emigrated to the United States in 1947 and worked as an engineer before he became a Baptist minister. Tan’s mother, Daisy, came to the United States after her first marriage crumbled due to spousal abuse; although she had three children by her former husband, Chinese law at that time would not permit a divorced woman to gain custody of her offspring and Daisy kept her first family a secret from her American-born children for many years. It was only after she lost her oldest son, Peter, and her husband to brain cancer that Daisy would reveal her past. Still a teen at the time of the death of both her father and brother, Tan grew up with her younger brother in her mother’s home, a fact that is reflected in the primacy of mother-daughter relationships within her fiction.

Of course, these elements rise to the surface in Tan’s writings. It’s been a while since I’ve read The Joy Luck Club or The Kitchen God’s  Wife. Still, these characters and situations remain with me. They became the standard in my future reading. Tan’s writing has been rather formative in my reading life.

Please check out:

 

National Asian Pacific American Heritage Month – Jhumpa Lahiri


Jhumpa Lahiri | Goodreads

This post is part of a feature at Jorie’s Reads called “Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors! that Candice P. of WarmCuppaTea and I are doing this May.

My first memory of Jhumpa Lahiri was of the author talking about her new novel The Namesake with TV hostess Martha Stewart back in 2003. Lahiri’s description of Bengali immigrants having a son in Boston compelled me to request this book at HCPL. When her novel arrived, I could hardly put it down to eat or sleep.

According to the Gale Literary Database, Lahiri:

Born 1967, in London, England; daughter of a librarian and a teacher; married Alberto Vourvoulias (a journalist), January 15, 2001; children: two. Education: Barnard College, B.A.; Boston University, M.A. (English), M.A. (creative writing), M.A. (comparative literature and the arts), Ph.D. Addresses: Home: New York, NY.

As I’m not a big fan of short stories, I held off on reading her other books for years. Nonetheless, I gave in and was pleased with both of these collections. My only complaint was that I wanted to know more about these characters.

So, why am I making such a fuss? These characters, most of them of Bengali descent, are so different from me but I can identify with them. That’s Lahiri’s magic. Just give her a try and you’ll be mesmerized as well.

For Candice’s profile on Tite Kubo, check out her post “National Asian Pacific American Heritage Month – Tite Kubo – Creator of Bleach“.

 

Celebrating Asian – Pacific American Authors!


Asian Characters | morgueFile Free photos 

As the U.S. Government sees it,

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month – a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian-Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island).

So, why not recognize a few of my favorite authors of this heritage? So, coming soon, Jorie’s Reads will share profiles on:

  1. Jhumpa Lahiri
  2. Amy Tan
  3. Jamie Ford

Who are your favorites?