Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park (Bloggerversary Challenge)


Mansfield Park (Penguin Classics) by Jane Austen | Jorie's Store by Amazon

Title: Mansfield Park
Author: Jane Austen, Johanna Ward
ISBN: 9781441796394
Length: 16 hours, 47 minutes
Publication Date: Mar 08, 2005
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Genre: Novel of Manners
Source: Harris County Public Library

Bloggerversary Giveaway

Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: Alongside annual challenges I inflict upon myself, I also like reading at least one Jane Austen novel. This year, I added Austen’s Mansfield Park to the ballot. Mansfield Park received the most votes (out of all contenders) and I requested it from Harris County Public Library (HCPL). I listened to the eAudio on my Nook.

Summary (A little background): Austen sets up the story with three sisters: Lady Bertram, Mrs. Norris, and Mrs. Price. Lady Bertram married well. Mrs. Norris married a parson. Mrs. Price, however, married a naval officer. Shortly after the Prices’ marriage, Mr. Price becomes wounded and then pensioned as a Lieutenant at half pay. (Reminding me of the Three Little Pigs!) The Prices follow this by having nine children. Affecting the appearance of a caring parson’s wife, Mrs. Norris suggests to Lady Bertram that the Bertrams take on one of the Price kids to live with the Bertrams at their home, Mansfield Park. Ultimately, ten year old Fanny Price goes to live at Mansfield Park.

(Story Time): Fanny grows up with her four older cousins – Tom, Edmund, Maria (pronounced Mariah), and Julia. With the fine exception of Edmund, the Bertrams treat Fanny like a poor, stupid relation. Her Aunt Norris is probably worse on this front than the Bertrams. As years pass, Fanny’s gratitude for Edmund shifts to a deep romantic love. Things remain the same until the Crawford Siblings appear on the scene. Herein lies the discovery of Fanny’s true character.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Mansfield Park stands out among Austen’s bibliography. Austen’s works bridge the Age of Reason and Romanticism but this particular novel leans more towards pragmatism.

What I Liked: I prefer Fanny to Emma any day! While she and Edmund may seem like a set of wet blankets, I find her sweet, clever, and authentic.

What I Disliked: Well, some of these characters were absolute jerks! They think one act of altruism covers them for life.

RR - Green

 

 Rainbow Rating: Green – Parental Guidance 

Song: J.S. BACH, Harpsichord Concertos BWV1052, BWV1053, BWV1056, BWV1054, I Barocchisti

You might also like:

For more, check out the following sites:

Advertisements

Dads Rock, Too! A Select Listing for Father’s Day @ Jorie’s Store


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird_(film)

Theatrical release poster – To Kill a Mockingbird | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

As I did for Mother’s Day,  I’m sharing books featuring some of my fathers/father figures in literature. Did your favorite dad make the list?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
~~~~~
Pride and Prejudice  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  A Christmas Carol (Dover Thrift Editions)
A Room with a View  Savvy  To Kill a Mockingbird
Cry, the Beloved Country  Saint Maybe  The Book Thief
~~~~~
     

Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Revisited Challenge)


Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories By Truman Capote | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Truman Capote’s
Release Date: 1958

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 978-0679745655
Hours: 160
Source: Harris County Public Library 

* 1001 Books Book

Add Book to Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: Initially, I listened to this novella on audiotape. I enjoyed how more than one actor read different parts in the story. However, I considered Elizabeth Ashley of “Evening Shade” fame an odd selection for the voice of Holly Golightly. Nevertheless, I never reviewed this Truman Capote classic. When Breakfast at Tiffany’s won in the Revisited Challenge, I read a printed version.

Summary: An unnamed narrator befriends his enchanting neighbor, Holly Golightly, in the autumn of 1943. Holly insists on referring to the narrator as “Fred” because he reminds her of her older brother. “Fred” and Holly live in apartments in the same brownstone which is located in Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Holly is only a eighteen or nineteen year old girl from the country. Yet, she’s turned into a cosmopolitan darling of cafe society. Holly holds no job and maintains her lifestyle by socializing with wealthy men. These men take her out on the town and shower her with money and expensive gifts. Author Capote called Holly an American geisha.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I saw the film before I read the book. I was surprised that the events of the book took place in 1943-44.

What I Liked: I liked the narrator’s tone throughout the novella. As a reader, I felt his warmth and affection, especially towards Holly Golightly.

What I Disliked: Yet, I wasn’t quite comfortable with this American geisha lifestyle.

RR - Orange  Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 


Song: 
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (3/9) Movie CLIP – Moon River (1961) 

You might also like:

For more, check out the following sites:

Jane Austen’s Emma (Revisited Challenge)


 

Title and Author(s):  Jane Austen’s Emma (Read by Nadia May)
Release Date: Jul 18, 2006

Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.

ISBN: 9781441797339
Hours: 15 hours, 18 minutes
Source: eBranch Harris County Public Library 
* 1001 Books Book

Add Book to Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: I read Jane Austen’s Emma for the first time in 2008. However, I didn’t review it. So, earlier this year, I posted the Revisited Challenge. One of the winners was Emma.

Summary: Ever heard that proverb “An idle mind is the devil’s workshop”? Well, it certainly seems to be the case with the “handsome, clever, and rich…” Emma Woodhouse. Emma’s mother passed away before Emma could remember her and her elder sister, Isabella Knightley has a family of her own to rear. She was reared in the nice estate of her old, doting father and a kindly governess, Miss Taylor. The only person who calls her out on anything is her brother-in law, George Knightley. When Emma sets up Miss Taylor with widower Mr Weston and they marry, Emma deems herself a matchmaker. Mr. Knightley tries to talk her out of pursuing this pastime but she continues to do so for her naive, new friend Miss Harriet Smith. So, Emma’s idle mind leads Emma to numerous misadventures of the heart.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Emma, which appeared in 1816, was the last novel published during Austen’s lifetime

What I Liked: I actually liked Mr. Knightley and Emma’s rival, Miss Jane Fairfax. The writing, of course, was genius.

What I Disliked: I didn’t like Emma very much. Yet, I found her very sympathetic. I didn’t want anything bad to happen to her. What do you think of Emma Woodhouse?

RR - Green

 

Rainbow Rating: Green – Parental Guidance 

Song:  Sam Cooke – Cupid

You might also like:

For more, check out the following sites:

Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass


Jorie’s Store – Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass

 
Title and Author(s):  Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass
Release Date:
 Apr 06, 2012
Publisher: Thorndike Press; Lrg edition

ISBN: 978-1410448743
Pages: 695
Source: Harris County Public Library

Add Book to Goodreads

Reasons for Reading: Feel free to click onto this link TBRs – Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass. Unfortunately,  I was reading this book when my Nook went on the fritz. It was a huge relief to me when I found the large print version of this novel at the library branch. Thus, I was able to quickly finish this book.

Summary: It’s 1915, three years after losing her mother and sister (Helen and Eulah) on that fateful voyage of the HMS Titanic, Sibyl Allston suffers in near silence as she runs the Boston household of her laconic, shipping magnate Lan Allston. She seeks solace in her late mother’s medium. When her brother, Harlan, gets kicked out of Harvard and his involvement with an odd woman seems the cause, old flame Professor Benton Derby reaches out to Sibyl. With Benton, Sibyl embarks on an odd journey of discovery of Boston’s Chinatown and its opium dens. Sibyl’s 1915 point of view is mingled with those of Helen and Eulah’s 1912 and Lannie’s 1867. I won’t say anymore about Lannie.

One Thing I Learned from reading Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and GlassI knew of the Widener Library at Harvard but I didn’t know the story behind it. For more info, visit History – Widener Library – Harvard College Library.

What I Liked: The characters were well conceived – particularly Sibyl, Eulah, and Lan. The settings appeared well-researched and recreated. Howe’s descriptive writing paints the picture without being gratuitous. I appreciated the integration of real-life people such as Harry Widener and Edwin Friend. By the end of the novel, I truly appreciated Lan’s love for and devotion to his family. Howe’s afterward was great and she made significant points in this section.

What I Disliked: Well, it wasn’t “Deliverance Dane.” The beginning didn’t pull me in as quickly as Howe’s first effort did. Once I put aside my “Deliverance Dane” measuring stick, I got more out of this book. Also, the presence of opium in this book made me extremely uncomfortable. Nonetheless, I DID like the resolution of the opium abuse. Lastly, I wanted to know more about Dovie, Harlan’s mysterious girlfriend.

Song: Al Bowlly “Melancholy Baby”

You might also like:

For more on Katherine Howe’s The House of Velvet and Glass, check out the following sites: