Top Ten Books Jorie Would Give To Readers Who Have Never Read Mysteries


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

Top Ten Books I’d Give To Readers Who Have Never Read X (examples: New Adult novels, historical fiction, a certain author, books about a certain topic, etc)

(I’ve selected the first book in series whenever there’s more than one book.)

(Thank you,  LibraryThing for the images)

1.  Sandra Brown’s Deadline

Deadline by Sandra Brown

2. Michael Connelly’s The Lincoln Lawyer (Mickey Haller/Lincoln Lawyer Series)

The Lincoln Lawyer: A Novel by Michael…

3.  Janet Evanovich’s One For the Money (Stephanie Plum Series) 

One for the Money

4. Sue Grafton’s A is for Alibi (The Alphabet Mysteries Series)

A is for Alibi by Sue Grafton

5.  John Grisham’s The Firm 

The Firm: A Novel by John Grisham

6. Kay Hooper’s  Stealing Shadows (Bishop/Special Crimes Unit Series ( Stealing Shadows Trilogy ))

Stealing Shadows (Shadows Trilogy) by Kay…

7. JA Jance’s Desert Heat (Joanna Brady Series) 

Desert Heat (Joanna Brady Mysteries) by J.…

8. JA Jance’s Until Proven Guilty (JP Beaumont Series) 

Until Proven Guilty by J. A. Jance

9. Alexander McCall Smith’s The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency (The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency Series)

The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (The No.…

10. JD Robb’s Naked in Death (… in Death) 

Naked in Death (In Death, Book 1) by J. D.…

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Mary Higgins Clark’s All Through the Night


All Through the Night by Mary Higgins Clark | LibraryThing

(A special shout out to Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer! Merry Christmas!)

Clark, M. H. (1998). All through the night. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster.  9780684856605

Reasons for Reading : My mom likes reading little Christmas books. She also owns a few. Case in point: Mary Higgins Clark’s All Through the Night. As I’ve put off reading beyond the first page of the narrative until December 22, I hadn’t gotten very far with it. However, I quickly got into this yuletide suspense story.

Summary: A chalice is stolen from St. Clement’s. A baby girl is abandoned at the same rectory. Seven years later, lottery winner Alvirah and her down to earth husband Willy don’t take a holiday from sleuthing. As Sister Cordelia, Willy’s sibling, readies for the Christmas pageant at a thrift shop/after-school center, Sister Cordelia faces the inevitable shutdown of the shelter. The donation of Kate’s home seems to be just the Christmas miracle for which they’ve prayed. Then, the tenants from “the other realm” seem to destroy this. All three of these elements meet and Alvirah’s on the case to solve these mysteries before Christmas Day.

What I Liked:  I liked this book and I found it easy to read. I appreciated that this book wasn’t gratuitous as violence was “offstage.” Not much time was spent on details and that gave readers the freedom to create the appearance of settings and costumes. Also, I liked that characters didn’t shy away from their faith but they weren’t sanctimonious. Overall, the tone is heartwarming and leaves one with warm fuzzies at the end (I hope I didn’t just spoil this! 🙂 )

What I Disliked: Maybe this was just a little too neatly tied up. I would’ve liked a few red herrings in the book. Okay, one would’ve been fantastic. Another thing (just one of my latest quirks) is that I like it when writers set a book at a certain time. So, maybe a reader who discovers All Through the Night a decade from now won’t be disturbed so much about the lack of iPads or whatever other technology is out there. The author could say 1991 and 1998.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT – Christmas Lullaby – Tom Roush.avi – YouTube

Setting: New York City

You might also like:

  • The Christmas Wedding by James Patterson and Richard DiLallo
  • Trading Christmas by Debbie Macomber
  • What Child is This? A Christmas Story by Caroline B. Cooney
  • Visions of Sugar Plums by Janet Evanovich
For more on Mary Higgins Clark’s All Through the Night, check out the following sites:

Seeing the Story – One for the Money


Jorie's Store - One For the Money | Amazon Heigl, K., O’Mara, J., Sunjata, D., Leguizamo, J., Shepherd, S., Reynolds, D.,  Rosenberg, T., … Abishag Productions. (2012). One for the money. Santa Monica, Calif: Lions Gate Home Entertainment.

Reasons for Watching: After reading several of the Stephanie Plum books, other fans and I long anticipated an adaptation to film adaptation of One for the Money. We wanted to see these kooky characters and events brought to life. Finally, the requested copy via HCPL arrived at our neighborhood library branch.

Summary : Tough New Jersey native Stephanie Plum (Katherine Heigl) looks to have hit rock bottom; she’sdivorced, jobless, and not making rent. Stephanie’s family tells her that her pervy cousin Vinny needs help in his bail bonds office. When she inquires, though, Vinny needs a bond enforcement agent (BEA) – a bounty hunter. That’s where she learns about Joe Morelli (Jason O’Mara) has jumped bail. Morelli and Stephanie were, well, previously amorous, and now Stephanie holds a grudge. So, she becomes a BEA and hunts down Morelli with the help of mentor called Ranger (Daniel Sunjata), a prostitute named Lula (Sherri Shepherd), and her crazy family to get the true bad guys.

Book to Movie Adaptation : Since the last time I read One for the Money was nearly five years ago, I’ll only remark on the actors selected. First, I felt the movie was cleaner than the books and that goes for the characters, especially. Second, I thought Heigl and O’Mara were good. Shepherd would’ve been great had it not been for keeping the film’s PG-13 rating. Third, I had really wanted the late Estelle Getty for the role of that senile Grandma Mazur and thought Debbie Reynolds was all wet.

Review : As I mentioned, maybe I should’ve reread the book shortly before seeing the movie. I wasn’t totally crazy about the portrayals. The bottom line, though, I would tune in for another movie – Two for the Dough – Julie Anne Robinson?

Three Out of Five Pearls 

Top Ten Books I Read Because Of Another Blogger


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

September 13: Top Ten Books I Read Because Of Another Blogger (In honor of BBAW!)

(These are books that were recommended by friends, family, colleagues, and library patrons as well as bloggers.

1. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins – (The Broke and the Bookish)

2. The Luxe Series by Anna Godbersen – (Colleague)

3. Beth Revis’ Across the Universe series – (Colleague)

4. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins – (Colleagues)

5. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows – (Friend)

6. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson – (Family)

7. The Virgin Blue by Tracy Chevalier – (Friend)

8. The Shack by William P. Young – (Family)

9. The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich –  (Friend)

10. Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen – (Neal Wyatt/ Library Journal)   

Top Ten Sequels Jorie’s Dying to Read


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

September 6: Top Ten Sequels Jorie’s Dying to Read

1. V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton – I began reading the first Kinsey Milhone last week and it’s addictive.

2. Beautiful Days by Anna Godbersen – Sometimes, I wish I’d waited until all the books were published before reading the first. I may need to review Bright Young Things.

3. The Next Book in Beth Revis’ Across the Universe series – I’m happy there’s more that Revis has to say but I want it five minutes ago.

4. Whatever Sarah Dessen publishes next – Not a series but she drops enough Easter eggs that it’s always good to read these in the order they’re published.

5. Persepolis III by Marjane Satrapi – Yes, it’s out there but not in English.

6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson – Actually, I’m reading it right now. However, I put aside a few other books just to finish the Millennium Trilogy.

7. Aurora Teagarden Series by Charlaine Harris – Okay, I’ve not read one of these. Nonetheless, my mom picked up the first one and it definitely qualifies for my TBR. Unfortunately, Harris has shelved these as she writes more Sookie Stackhouse novels.

8. The Robert Langdon books by Dan Brown – While these books aren’t my favorites, I do like the random facts within each volume.

9. The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich – I haven’t kept up with Ms. Plum in a while but I hear she’s making her between Morelli and Ranger public in the next one.

10. The Case for Christ series by Lee Strobel – I need to read all of these.

Top Ten Favorite Love Stories In Books | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

NEXT WEEK THE TOPIC IS: Top Ten Book to Movie adaptations (for those movies that actually didn’t butcher the book!) See a list of future TTT here.

However, this week’s challenge is Top Ten Favorite Love Stories in Books. So, here goes . . .

  1. Tristan by Gottfried von Strassburg: The honorable Cornish knight Tristan follows orders of his uncle, King Mark, to escort his uncle’s comely bride, the Princess Isolde. Isolde possesses a magic love potion which she and her betrothed are to share. However, Isolde and Tristan have the drink.
  2. Katherine by Anya Seton: This historical fiction novel features the story of the remarkable Katherine Swynford. This real person caught the attention of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. While they didn’t marry until close to the end of their lives, this story resonates to this days.
  3. Othello by William Shakespeare: I made myself only select one Shakespeare play. Othello the Moor marries the fair Desdemona. Desdemona chooses Othello over the foppish men of Venetian childhood and loves Othello eternally. However, the evil Iago turns Othello into the green-eyed monster.
  4. “Sonnets from the Portuguese” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning: the sickly and hermetic Elizabeth believes herself to be dying. However, her fortune takes a turn for the better with the young, dashing Robert Browning.
  5. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough: It’s a little seamy but still deserves mention. Meggie falls in love with Ralph de Briccasart, the Roman Catholic priest.
  6. The Divine Comedy by Dante: Forget Francesca and Paola, I’m talking about Dante the Pilgrim and his ladylove, Beatrice. He admired her so much that in his writing, Beatrice guides him through Heaven.
  7. Atonement by Ian McEwan: Dilettante Cecilia Tallis and overachieving Robbie Turner unite in a pivotal way, changing the two permanently. When Robbie loses favor, Cecelia remains at his side.
  8. Beauty and the Beast by  Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve:  This story strikes similar chords to that of King Lear. The youngest daughter, Belle, is the truest beauty. She stays at the Beast’s Castle to make up for what her father did. When she sees this brute suffering, she cries over him.
  9. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand: Even though I absolutely abhor the sexual violence (rape even) and Rand’s masogyny, this is a remarkable story of love.  Roark and Dominique bring out the best in one another and have a happier end than most.
  10. The Stephanie Plum Series by Janet Evanovich: This is probably my favorite love triangle in literature. Stephanie Plum’s attention is coveted by Joe Moretti and Ranger. These days, I root for Ranger.

Pulled Out a Plum. . . One for the Money: the First Stephanie Plum novel by Janet Evanovich


One for the Money by Janet Evanovich | LibraryThing

Evanovich, J. (2001). One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel. New York: HarperTorch. ISBN: 0061009059

The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich begins with One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel. Stephanie Plum is a Jersey Girl down on her luck; she is out of a job and then her Miata is repossessed. Pretty soon, she may have to move back in with her parents and wacky Grandma Mazur. When push comes to shove, Stephanie blackmails her slimy cousin and bail bondsman Vinne Plum into giving her a job as a Bond Enforcement Agent or B.E.A. or bounty hunter. As a bounty hunter, Stephanie must apprehend people who have used Vinnie’s services but have skipped bail. She becomes acquainted and reacquainted with a comical cast of characters. Stephanie very first case happens to be bringing in vice cop Joseph “Joe” Morelli. Stephanie’s previous sexual encounters with Morelli, a boxer with a nasty temper, bad “car-ma,” and training with expert bounty hunter Carlos Mañoso a.k.a. Ranger add to the misadventures of Stephanie’s induction into the life of a bounty hunter.

One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel focuses first on the crime of bail skipping. The victim, Vinnie Plum, loses money when someone fails to appear (FTA). Stephanie must find Morelli and make him appear in court. Since Stephanie operates as a rookie bounty hunter, solving the mystery is really not part of her job description. In this sense, Stephanie is an amateur detective. She does encounter murder along the way and takes solving that crime into her own hands. Stephanie’s curious nature and tenacity as well as the circumstances of F.T.A. leads her to solving the crime in this book and subsequent books in the series. With her smart mouth and comical reactions to situations at hand, Stephanie is a sympathetic character like many amateur detectives. Yet, as a bounty hunter, there are some private investigative and police procedural elements (Saricks 153). In the end, I still find Stephanie Plum to be an amateur – especially in this first novel.

I knew I wanted to read a Stephanie Plum book for this assignment because I find that Janet Evanovich brings in new readers to the Mystery Genre. After evaluating the Stephanie Plum series, I decided on One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel because it was the start of the series. While Evanovich excels in regurgitating facts and reintroducing characters in her other Stephanie Plum novels, I decided it would be easiest for patrons to start with the beginning and follow Stephanie’s career. Additionally, locating a copy of One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel would be simpler than finding Evanovich’s latest Stephanie Plum installment.

I found the book to be an easy read and I was automatically rooting for Stephanie. While I did not feel as though she could save the day, I crossed my fingers she would be able to save her own neck. I found some parts of the book to be rather vulgar (i.e. foul language, sexual situations and innuendo, and violence.) Yet, I believed the characters would not be so convincing if they did not cuss. Ultimately, I thought the book was hilarious and I found myself ready to put my hands on the next book.

The cast of characters, if nothing else, are unforgettable. Evanovich and narrator Stephanie describe them well with so few words. Immediately, I imagined Grandma Mazur being played by Estelle Getty. I look forward to seeing if Stephanie ever makes a decision between Morelli or fellow bounty hunter – Ranger. I enjoyed the interaction between Stephanie and Lula, too.

I definitely recommend the Stephanie Plum novels to women. One for the money: the First Stephanie Plum novel is wisecracking and romantic simultaneously. Stephanie’s wisecracks, along with her sweet tooth and numerous other human weaknesses make Stephanie accessible to the reader. She is a normal person placed in some rather outrageous circumstances. Evanovich previously wrote romantic fiction and elements from this genre appear between Stephanie and Morelli.

Four out of Five Pearls!

 

Saricks, J. G. (2001). The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction. ALA Readers’ Advisory Series. Chicago: American Library Association.