Top Ten Characters Who Would’ve Sat at Jorie’s Lunch Table in High School


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

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top ten characters who would have sat at Jamie’s lunch table in high school

1.  Cinna in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games Trilogy 

2. Yuni in Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao 

3.  Linda Ramirez in Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex

4. Ralph Ames in J.A. Jance’s J.P. Beaumont Series

5.  Sonali in Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake 

6. Annika Gianinni in Stieg Larrson’s  Millennium Series 

7. Jonas in Lois Lowry’s The Giver

8. Han Solo from George Lucas’ Star Wars   

9. The Little Prince in Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince

10. Sara in Alisa Valdes’ The Dirty Girls Social Club series

Top Ten Most Popular Authors on Jorie’s Bookshelf


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

top ten authors we own the most books of

(Normally, I prefer borrowing to buying books. Nonetheless, I own books I’ve seen on sale at the Friends of Freeman Bookstore.)

(Thank you, Goodreads, for the images of the following authors.)

1. Julia Alvarez

Julia Álvarez

2. Sandra Brown

Sandra Brown

3. Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton

4. Jeffrey Eugenides

http://www.bookpage.com/the-book-case/2011/02/09/jeffrey-eugenides-and-the-marriage-plot/

5. Katherine Howe

Katherine Howe

6. Stephen King

Stephen King

7. Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver

7. Alan Paton

Alan Paton

8. William Shakespeare

The Chandos portrait of famous writer</p>
<p>http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/britons/briton3.htm

9. Lee Strobel

Lee Strobel

10. Bruce Wilkinson

Bruce Wilkinson

President’s Day 2014


Lincoln Memorial

Since President’s Day seems to be an excellent time to shop, please browse Jorie’s Store on Amazon 😛 … Seriously, I’m blessed that I live in a land where we elect our officials.
      

 

         

Books I Love – 2014


This Valentine’s Day, I’m sharing some of the books I loved reading. By clicking on the covers, you can visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon by clicking on the following book covers. Shopping at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! ❤ 🙂
      

A Cafecito Story: El Cuento Del Cafecito  Rainwater by Sandra Brown   Middlesex: A Novel (Oprah's Book Club)

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane  The Namesake: A Novel  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (P.S.)

 The Little Prince 70th Anniversary Gift Set (Book/CD/Downloadable Audio)  Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Persephone Classics)  The Shack    

Top Ten Authors That Jorie Automatically Puts on Hold


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

Julia’s Top Ten Auto-Buy Authors

(Check Out the Revisited Challenge on Jorie’s Reads and vote for your favorites)

  1. Sarah Dessen
  2. Michael Connelly
  3. Katherine Howe
  4. Dan Brown
  5. Sarah Addison Allen
  6. Stephen King
  7. Kay Hooper
  8. John Green
  9. Julia Alvarez
  10. Jeffrey Eugenides

Kim Edwards’ The Memory Keeper’s Daughter


The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards | LibraryThing

Edwards, K. (2005). The memory keeper’s daughter. New York: Viking. 9780786571031

Reasons for Reading : One of my friends asked me to read The Memory Keeper’s Daughter. (Check out its entry on my TBR list.) Initially, I checked it out from HCPL. Then, I found I could check it out in eBook format from Houston Public Library.  I did this so I could read it on my Nook during my vacation.

Summary: Due to a blizzard in 1964 Kentucky, Dr. David Henry delivers his own twins. First, David delivers a healthy son, Paul. After delivering his daughter, Phoebe, David sees that she has Down Syndrome. Wanting to spare his wife, Norah, heartache, David asks his loyal nurse, Caroline Gill, to secretly institutionalize his daughter. Caroline, though, leaves Kentucky with the baby girl and raises her as her own daughter.  This split second decision changes the lives of David, Norah, Caroline, and their children.

What I Liked: The language of the narrative is lovely. Also, I felt David’s motives were well-explained by the author. He seemed earnest and loving. Norah’s relationship with her sister, Bree. I truly admired Caroline for her love and heroism. It was a relief to me that Caroline created a family of friends for her daughter, Phoebe. Lastly, I found the photography motif beautiful.

What I Disliked: Towards the end of the book, I wondered if Edwards just didn’t know what to do with it. She added in some characters in the eleventh hour to help resolve conflicts. Throughout the book, I wanted to throttle the good doctor and say “Tell your wife that your daughter lives!”

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: Kentucky Rain-Lyrics-Elvis Presley – YouTube

Setting : Kentucky, Pittsburgh, Aruba, France

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For more on Kim Edwards’ The Memory Keeper’s Daughter, check out the following sites:

Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth


Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri | LibraryThing

Lahiri, J. (2008). Unaccustomed earth. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 9780307265739

Reasons for Reading : I’m not a big fan of short stories. However, as I’ve enjoyed Lahiri’s The Namesake, I pulled Unaccustomed Earth off the shelf at the HCPL branch where I work.

Summary: Lahiri tells eight stories of first generation Bengali Americans.  All these stories deal with the ups and downs of families and relationships.

Unaccustomed Earth is broken into two parts. Part I is comprised of the first five stories. Among them are “Unaccustomed Earth,” “Hell-Heaven,” “A Choice of Accommodations,” “Only Goodness,” and “Nobody’s Business.” The book is the namesake of “Unaccustomed Earth” tells of Ruma, a young mother in Seattle. When Ruma hosts her visiting widower father, she prepares for him to live with them. While her father tends to her garden and bonds with her son, he has his own ideas about what he wants to do. “Hell-Heaven” confronts the topics of social strata in both old and new worlds.  “A Choice of Accommodations” shares the nearly failed attempt of a husband to turn an old high school friend’s wedding into a romantic weekend for his wife. Lahiri tells of a sister who doesn’t know what to do about her alcoholic brother in “Only Goodness.” Part I ends with “Nobody’s Business,” a lovesick grad student watches his lovely Bengali roommate’s life implode.

Part II is called “Hema and Kaushik.” These three stories – “Once in a Lifetime,” “Year’s End,” and “Going Ashore” focus on two characters – Hema and Kaushik. Teenage Kaushik and his family stay with young Hema’s family. While they go on to lead very seperate lives, circumstances reunite them twenty years later.  

What I Liked : Lahiri’s writing style compels me to continue reading her work. I found myself empathizing with the jerkiest of jerks and understanding their plights. Lahiri’s talent shines from within Unaccustomed Earth.

What I Disliked : By the time I’m absorbed and enthralled in the story, it has ended! I especially wanted to read more about Hema and Kaushik.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Nicola Conte – Dossier Omega – YouTube

Setting: Cambridge Massachusetts, Seattle, India, Italy, Thailand

You might also like:

For more on Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth, check out the following sites:

Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art


Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d’Art by Christopher Moore | LibraryThing

Moore, C. (2012). Sacre bleu: A comedy d’art. New York: William Morrow. 9780061779749

Reasons for Reading : I posted Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art on my TBR list. Check out my reasons for reading there.

Summary: News of the suicide of volatile artist Vincent van Gogh rocks Parisian baker and artist Lucien Lessard and his good friend  Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. Compounding issues is the sudden reappearance of Lucien’s MIA girlfriend, Juliette and the nasty little guy who’s known as The Colorman. Lucien and Henri take the reader for a ride on the crazy train, encountering figures in the French art scene along the way.

What I Liked : Author Christopher Moore is uproariously humorous. There were numerous “ROL” (read out loud) moments throughout this novel. Characters such as fictitious Lucien and Juliette appealed greatly. The physical book is gorgeous with images discussed in the narrative and has blue typing.

What I Disliked : Some curse words here and there don’t bother me but the language used by various characters was beyond nasty. Also, I thought sometimes Moore crossed the line between amusingly irreverent and crazy wicked. One point late in the novel made a reference to bestiality that had major cringe factor.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: Bobby Vinton Blue Velvet – YouTube

Setting : Paris, France with stops in the French countryside, Italy, England, and the US

You might also like:

For more on Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art, check out the following sites:

Stephen King’s 11/22/63


11/22/63: A Novel by Stephen King | LibraryThing

King, S. (2011). 11/22/63: A novel. New York: Scribner. 9781451627282

Reasons for Reading : I read Stephen King’s The Dead Zone a few years ago after reading King’s memoir On Writing. In The Dead Zone, teacher and coma survivor John Smith asks “If you could kill Hitler, would you?” When I saw 11/22/63 on the NYT Bestsellers List, I realized King took this same question in a different direction. I added my name to the waiting list for a copy from HCPL. Later, I purchased a copy from the Friends of Freeman Library Bookstore.

Summary: Jake Epping teaches English at Lisbon Falls High in Lisbon Falls, Maine. He also earns
extra money by taking on GED courses. Reading janitor Harry Dunning’s essay about the horrific night when Harry lost his family and gained a limp fifty years prior moves the normally dry-eyed Jake to tears.

Soon after Harry earns his GED, diner owner Al shares a secret with Jake; there’s a portal outside his supply room which leads to September 1958. Thus, Al enlists Jake on a mission to save JFK from assassination.

What I Liked : I appreciated the short segments which allowed me to read a little bit at a time. I also enjoyed the whole “What if?” aspect. I liked how King limited some of the possibilities by creating a 1958 portal instead of putting Jake into a time machine that could go anywhere or anytime.

What I Disliked : As a Texan (a Houstonian), my familiarity with state geography is above average 🙂 . I wouldn’t describe Dallas and Killeen as being all that close. Also, Killeen has two “L’s” unlike how it’s spelled throughout the book. Then, there’s the whole saying “Everything’s bigger in Texas.” That’s because the state itself is the second biggest in the USA. Having gone to college in Waco which is in Central Texas, I can attest to the fact that I could not smell the oil fumes from Midland and Odessa. Lastly, I didn’t think this book should’ve been over 800 pages!

 Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: In the Mood by Glenn Miller – YouTube

Setting : Maine, Florida, Texas

You might also like:

For more on Stephen King’s11/22/63, check out the following sites:

Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower


The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky | LibraryThing

Chbosky, S. (1999). The perks of being a wallflower. New York: Pocket Books. 9780671027346

Reasons for Reading : The first time I heard about The Perks of Being a Wallflower was in library school. Stephen Chbosky’s work was banned by the Library Patrons of Texas. I hadn’t thought much about it until I saw that a movie based on the book would come out later in 2012. Thus, I requested and checked out the book from HCPL.

Summary : Assuming the alias “Charlie,” a troubled high school freshman writes letters to an unnamed friend, starting in the 1991. Through these rather intimate letters, Charlie describes his family, his teacher Bill who assigns extra essays to write, his senior friends, Patrick and Sam[antha], and his late Aunt Helen.

What I Liked : Nothing was sugarcoated in this book. Actually, it was pretty raw stuff. The characters were original and realistic.

What I Disliked : Maybe it was necessary for Chbosky to set this in the early 1990s. Yet, it would’ve appealed more if it had been set around the time it was published – 1999. Also, I somber read and not for those looking for some gentle literature.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: The Smiths – Asleep – YouTube

Setting : Pittsburgh, PA

You might also like:

For more on Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower , check out the following sites: