Top Ten Most Popular Authors on Jorie’s Bookshelf


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

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top ten authors we own the most books of

(Normally, I prefer borrowing to buying books. Nonetheless, I own books I’ve seen on sale at the Friends of Freeman Bookstore.)

(Thank you, Goodreads, for the images of the following authors.)

1. Julia Alvarez

Julia Álvarez

2. Sandra Brown

Sandra Brown

3. Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton

4. Jeffrey Eugenides

http://www.bookpage.com/the-book-case/2011/02/09/jeffrey-eugenides-and-the-marriage-plot/

5. Katherine Howe

Katherine Howe

6. Stephen King

Stephen King

7. Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver

7. Alan Paton

Alan Paton

8. William Shakespeare

The Chandos portrait of famous writer</p>
<p>http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/britons/briton3.htm

9. Lee Strobel

Lee Strobel

10. Bruce Wilkinson

Bruce Wilkinson

President’s Day 2014


Lincoln Memorial

Since President’s Day seems to be an excellent time to shop, please browse Jorie’s Store on Amazon 😛 … Seriously, I’m blessed that I live in a land where we elect our officials.
      

 

         

Books I Love – 2014


This Valentine’s Day, I’m sharing some of the books I loved reading. By clicking on the covers, you can visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon by clicking on the following book covers. Shopping at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! ❤ 🙂
      

A Cafecito Story: El Cuento Del Cafecito  Rainwater by Sandra Brown   Middlesex: A Novel (Oprah's Book Club)

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane  The Namesake: A Novel  A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (P.S.)

 The Little Prince 70th Anniversary Gift Set (Book/CD/Downloadable Audio)  Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Persephone Classics)  The Shack    

National Hispanic Heritage Month – Julia Alvarez


Julia Alvarez | Goodreads

This post is part of a feature at Jorie’s Reads by Starry Night Elf called “Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month.”

As high school seniors, we had to read Julia Alvarez’s In the Time of the Butterflies. While the guys balked, I finished the book long before it was due. Alvarez’s rendering of the Mirabal Sisters’ cause led me to do research in my spare time. 

Later, I picked up her book How the García Girls Lost Their Accents and took note of her use of reverse chronological order. This is also present in In the Name of Salome. There’s no really unifying story line! 

Wikipedia states:

Many of Alvarez’s works are influenced by her experiences as a Dominican in the United States, and focus heavily on issues of assimilation and identity. Her cultural upbringing as both a Dominican and an American is evident in the combination of personal and political tone in her writing. She is known for works that examine cultural expectations of women both in the Dominican Republic and the United States, and for rigorous investigations of cultural stereotypes. In recent years, Alvarez has expanded her subject matter with works such as In the Name of Salomé (2000), a novel with Cuban rather than solely Dominican characters and fictionalized versions of historical figures.

In addition to her successful writing career, Alvarez is the current writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.

I often recommend Alvarez’s work. She writes everything from historical ficion –  In the Name of Salomé, Alvarez’s telling noted Dominican poet Salomé Ureña and her daughter, Camila Henríquez Ureña to Young Adult – Finding Miracles to poetry. I like how diverse she is in her writing.

For more on Julia Alvarez, check out her site by clicking here.

 

Top Ten Authors That Jorie Automatically Puts on Hold


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

Julia’s Top Ten Auto-Buy Authors

(Check Out the Revisited Challenge on Jorie’s Reads and vote for your favorites)

  1. Sarah Dessen
  2. Michael Connelly
  3. Katherine Howe
  4. Dan Brown
  5. Sarah Addison Allen
  6. Stephen King
  7. Kay Hooper
  8. John Green
  9. Julia Alvarez
  10. Jeffrey Eugenides

Alisa Valdes’ Lauren’s Saints of Dirty Faith


Jorie’s Store – Lauren’s Saints of Dirty Faith: A Dirty Girls Social Club Novel

Valdes, A. (2004). Playing with boys. New York: St. Martin’s Press. 9780312332341

Reasons for Reading: When I found the existence of another book about las sucias, I quickly searched the library catalog for Lauren’s saints of dirty faith: A Dirty Girls Social Club novel.  Ultimately, I requested the bookthrough Inter-Library Loan (ILL).

Summary: The third installment of the Dirty Girls Social Club series by Alisa Valdes (formerly Valdes – Rodriguez) shares the latest adventures of three of las sucias – newspaper columnist Lauren Fernandez, ghetto-fabulous Usnavys Rivera, and media mogul Rebecca Baca. Lauren finds herself running away from her lunatic ex-boyfriend, a Boston cop with the help of Usnavys and Rebecca. Laid off, Usnavys must back up and start doing things differently. Rebecca learns of her father’s “other family” and struggles in her relationships with her soul mate husband, Andre, and her son who has Autism.

What I Liked :  I liked las sucias. Also, I did think it was good to read about just three of the ladies as opposed to the entire six. It was especially good to see Usnavys mature. 

What I Disliked : While I admire Valdes for taking matters into her own hands and publishing this book independently, I wish sh had caught numerous spelling/grammar errors. Editing should’ve also caught a time that Rebecca’s son was referred to as a daughter/girl.

I admit I’m not much for reading introductions. I should’ve read where Valdes said she tried on Dean Koontz’s style on for size. Oh, I wished I’d skipped ALL the sections about Jason, Lauren’s psycho ex.

Lastly, I realized that while I read this installment, that my favorite sucia was Sara.

Two Out of Five Pearls

Song: Stone Temple Pilots – Plush (Video) – YouTube

Setting: Boston, New Mexico

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For more on Alisa Valdes’ Lauren’s Saints of Dirty Faith, check out the following sites:
 

Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez’s Playing with Boys


Playing with Boys: A Novel by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez | LibraryThing

Valdes, A. (2004). Playing with boys. New York: St. Martin’s Press. 9780312332341

Reasons for Reading : As I liked the previous three books I’d read by Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez, I requested Playing with Boys via HCPL.

Summary:. Talent agent Alexis hails from Texas and strives to make a name for herself. Gorgeous starlet Marcella’s smart mouth  has often cost her jobs. Screenwriter Olivia barely keeps up with her toddler son. They all have issues with guys as well as launching their careers. Yet, when these three radically different Latinas meet serendipitously in Los Angeles, they see that they can collaborate and rise to the top.

What I Liked :  I enjoyed catching glimpses of some of the sucias from The Dirty Girls Social Club books.Just having three main characters was good. Valdes-Rodriguez created compelling characters. I especially liked Alexis as she seemed to want the best for everyone and she used her talents for the greater good. I rooted for her to thrive.

What I Disliked : On the other hand, I couldn’t ever appreciate Marcella. I found myself scanning quickly through the sections she narrated. Also, I didn’t like that anyone who wasn’t one of three main characters had a section. I feel that Valdes-Rodriguez could’ve didn’t really have to move outside this group of friends for a point of view.

Two Out of Five Pearls

Song: Christina Milian – Us Against The World – YouTube

Setting : Los Angeles

You might also like:

For more on Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez’s Playing with Boys, check out the following sites: