Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (Revisited Challenge)


Alice’s Adventure’s in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
Release Date: May 15, 2007

Publisher: Naxos AudioBooks

ISBN: 9789629543860
Hours: 2 hours, 59 minutes
Source: Harris County Public Library Digital Media Catalog 

* 1001 Books Book

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Reasons for Reading: I read/listened to Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland back in 2010 but didn’t review it. Carroll’s classic was part of my Revisited Challenge and it received the most votes. Thus, I picked up an audio version for the second time.

Summary: Young, precocious Alice finds herself quite bored while sitting on the banks of the River Isis with her older sister. However, the talking, clothed, and tardy White Rabbit runs past and catches Alice’s attention. “Curiouser and curiouser…” Alice follows White Rabbit down a rabbit hole and tumbles down a long way passed many locked doors of varying sizes. When Alice lands, she finds herself to big to fit through a tiny door. Yet, she glimpses a lovely garden. As Alice sees a bottle labeled “DRINK ME,” she does just that. Thus, a whimsical, nonsensical adventure begins for Alice.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Many expressions we use today came from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland such as “Down the Rabbit-Hole,” and “Curiouser and curiouser!” Each time I listened to the book, I repeatedly found myself thinking “Oh, that came from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.”

What I Liked: I liked Alice’s fondness for her kitty cat – Dinah. I was happy that I got the audio version because there were many readers and I heard “The Lobster Quadrille.”

What I Disliked: I believe I have to be in the mood for “nonsense” to read and/or listen to it. As a child, I found all of this rather silly. Let’s just say I preferred less fantastical stuff.

RR - Green  Rainbow Rating: Green – Parental Guidance 


Song: 
What You Waiting For? (Clean Version) by Gwen Stefani | Vevo

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Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art


Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d’Art by Christopher Moore | LibraryThing

Moore, C. (2012). Sacre bleu: A comedy d’art. New York: William Morrow. 9780061779749

Reasons for Reading : I posted Christopher Moore’s Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Art on my TBR list. Check out my reasons for reading there.

Summary: News of the suicide of volatile artist Vincent van Gogh rocks Parisian baker and artist Lucien Lessard and his good friend  Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. Compounding issues is the sudden reappearance of Lucien’s MIA girlfriend, Juliette and the nasty little guy who’s known as The Colorman. Lucien and Henri take the reader for a ride on the crazy train, encountering figures in the French art scene along the way.

What I Liked : Author Christopher Moore is uproariously humorous. There were numerous “ROL” (read out loud) moments throughout this novel. Characters such as fictitious Lucien and Juliette appealed greatly. The physical book is gorgeous with images discussed in the narrative and has blue typing.

What I Disliked : Some curse words here and there don’t bother me but the language used by various characters was beyond nasty. Also, I thought sometimes Moore crossed the line between amusingly irreverent and crazy wicked. One point late in the novel made a reference to bestiality that had major cringe factor.

Three Out of Five Pearls

Song: Bobby Vinton Blue Velvet – YouTube

Setting : Paris, France with stops in the French countryside, Italy, England, and the US

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Top Ten Books I Wish I’d Read as a Kid | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

THE TOPIC FOR NEXT WEEK IS: Top Ten Best Debut Books (of any year..just your favorite debut books. If you want, you can focus on debuts of 2011 but I’d like to include any debut books for those who read older works). Check out future TTT topics.
  1. A Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter – My mom read and liked this book when she was a kid. For whatever reason, I was too busy reading The Babysitter’s Club.
  2. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry – I didn’t read this one until I was twenty-four. Nevertheless, I was taken in by the artistry of not only the illustrations but the phrases.
  3. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle – Several of my friends read this book as kids but I still have yet to read it. My TBR list is growing.
  4. Profiles in Courage by John F. Kennedy – As enthusiastic as I was about biographies, I somehow missed this one.
  5. Animals Should Definitely Not Wear Clothing by Judi & Ron Barrett – I didn’t discover this gem until I was an adult.  One of my coworkers read this to preschoolers and I was laughing right along with them.
  6. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll – I read this one a few months ago. As a child, I found the Disney feature nightmarish. Perhaps I could’ve overcome my fears if I’d actually read the book then. It’s not my favorite book ever but it is still pervasive.
  7. The Lorax by Dr. Seuss – Okay, I made the mistake of reading this to giddy preschoolers when I was twenty-six years old. If I’d read it as a child, I would’ve known better.
  8. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain –  Well, I enjoyed The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It’s likely I could’ve liked Tom Sawyer, too. Also, one of my favorite characters on “Lost”, Sawyer a.k.a. James Ford, was modeled after Tom Sawyer.
  9. Life of Pi by Yann Martel – This book wasn’t around when I was a kid but I liked it as an adult. The messages carried by Pi and Richard Parker show what God creatures can do.
  10. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas – I loved the Disney movie with Chris O’Donnell, Charlie Sheen, Kiefer Sutherland, and Oliver Platt. It’s a wonder I never read the book — until I consider that it’s the size of Luxembourg.