Top Ten Characters Who Would’ve Sat at Jorie’s Lunch Table in High School


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

top ten characters who would have sat at Jamie’s lunch table in high school

1.  Cinna in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games Trilogy 

2. Yuni in Junot Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao 

3.  Linda Ramirez in Jeffrey Eugenides’ Middlesex

4. Ralph Ames in J.A. Jance’s J.P. Beaumont Series

5.  Sonali in Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake 

6. Annika Gianinni in Stieg Larrson’s  Millennium Series 

7. Jonas in Lois Lowry’s The Giver

8. Han Solo from George Lucas’ Star Wars   

9. The Little Prince in Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince

10. Sara in Alisa Valdes’ The Dirty Girls Social Club series

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TBTB (Throwback Thursday Books) – Lois Lowry’s The Giver


The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver by Lois Lowry | LibraryThing

Lois Lowry makes a second appearance on the #TBTB. Last time, I recognized her work of historical fiction – Number the Stars. Today’s #TBTB introduced me to dystopian literature. I first read Lois Lowry’s The Giver on cassette tapes! Does that date me or what? Well, at least I was in junior high at the time. I marveled at how Lowry’s world building and work in science fiction.

A while back, I heard the book would be adapted to screen. I’ve long been curious how this will work. Hopefully, I’ll see the movie soon! I’ve heard wonderful things so far! 🙂

To read more, click on the Add to Goodreads button below

Goodreads 

For more walks down memory lane, check out my page for #tbtb:

books tbt

Comment Catch Up – Week of July 27, 2014


Van Gogh Starry Night Drawing | Wikimedia Commons | Public Domain Mark 1.0

Van Gogh Starry Night Drawing | Wikimedia Commons | Public Domain Mark 1.0

I present the 2nd Edition of a new-ish feature which offers me the chance to respond to some of my Stellar Visitors’ remarks.

Sunday, July 27, 2014 – 78th Edition of The Sunday Post

sherry fundin @ fundinmental said “I love Jance and Devil’s Claw looks great. Happy reading”

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “I’ve enjoyed Jance’s J.P. Beaumont and Joanna Brady series. Devil’s Claw was great!”

Amber @ Young Adult Indulgences said “The Lovely Bones has been on my reading list since the (I know, I know) movie came out. 🙂 I never manage to obtain it to read it though. *sigh*

Oh my gosh, you haven’t finished The Fault In Our Stars? Have you seen the movie or are you a “I want to read the book first” people? I’m like that. Unfortunately it didn’t work out for The Hunger Games. 😦

I wish I had checked out these Sunday Post blog posts before submitting my own. I keep looking at other ones and going “Aw man, I should have added that!”. In regards to your blog, it’s the “TBF” list. I definitely need to start adding that to mine.

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: ” 1) I’m hoping to have a couple of posts about The Lovely Bones go live soon. I’ve found both the book and movie to be polarizing among readers and viewers alike. I can’t wait to read the comments! 2) Yes, I’ve been waiting my turn on the library request list for The Fault in Our Stars and am thankful a friend took pity on me. 🙂 I hope to read the book before I see the movie – even if that means watching it at home in a few months. Sadly, I read The Hunger Games a few years ago and whenever I see the movies, I’m checking the action against the wikis. 3) I’m looking forward to checking out your Sunday Post blogs; I think of them as a “State of a Blog” or “The News You Missed.”

KimbaCaffeinated @ the Caffeinated Book Reviewer said “I like Blackstock and I really need to try Conversion. Have a fabulous week my friend!”

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “1) I picked up Blackstock from my church’s library for the Summer Reading Program (SRP). Even though I didn’t make the deadline for the SRP, I still plan to finish the book. Also, I imagine I’ll continue reading Blackstock’s Restoration series. 2) Katherine Howe’s The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane is one of my favorite reads in recent years and I anticipate the same with her Conversion. Happy August, my friend!

Fiza @ I’ll read till i drop said “I can’t believe it either, I have no idea where the weeks went.
Didn’t know I was a stellar….anything, thanks for the shoutout 😀

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “Of course you’re a Stellar Visitor! 😉 Thanks so much for visiting Jorie’s Reads!

Monday, July 28, 2014 – Books Before Movies! 

Katherine @ I Wish I Lived in a Library said “Other than Gone Girl I wasn’t aware of any of these! Of course I’m not a huge movie person so that doesn’t mean anything. Wild has been on my TBR list for awhile and I’d be interested to see that as a movie. Plus, I like Reese Witherspoon. I’m not sure I want to see Tess in movie form! The book was wonderful and awful. I don’t think I want to see it played out in front of me. If they do a bad job it will be dreadful but if they do a good job it will be excruciating to watch!

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “I read The Giver and Macbeth but nothing else on this list. Maybe I can lay my hands on Gone Girl and Wild before the movies hit theaters. I read Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley and approach her other works with trepidation. I also find Hardy daunting. Time will tell, though! “

Tuesday, July 29, 2014 – Top Ten Most Popular Authors on Jorie’s Bookshelf

ChrissiReads @ Chrissi Reads said “What a great list! 🙂 My sister would have Stephen King on hers, she loves him!”

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “Thank you! I like King’s blend of horror and SciFi.”

Anna @ herding cats & burning soup said “Very nice. I’ve only got Shakespeare from the group and I think one from Brown.”

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “I’ve got to have Shakespeare! Also, Sandra Brown’s dialogue and local color give her a permanent spot on my bookshelf – real or virtual. “

Katherine @ I Wish I Lived in a Library said “Interesting list! There’s several authors that I’m not familiar with and several that are on my list of authors that it’s past time I try. Stephen King heads that list! I’d love to reread Shakespeare. It’s been since high school since I read MacBeth but I loved it then. I wonder what I would get out of it now.”

Starry Night Elf’s Reply: “1) I think King is underrated. While I prefer his less bloody prose, I think he’s got serious talent and I’m sure he would make an intriguing guest at the dinner table. 2) I haven’t read all of Shakespeare’s works but I’ve marveled each time I’ve studied and/or watched his plays.”

Geraldine Brooks’ People of the Book


People of the book by Geraldine Brooks | LibraryThing

Brooks, G., & OverDrive, Inc. (2008). People of the book: A novel. New York, N.Y: Viking. 9781429591065

Reasons for Reading : As I sought eAudio, I stumbled upon Geraldine Brooks’ People of the Book. While I enjoyed listening to the book, I realized I wouldn’t be able to finish listening to it before it was due. Thus, I checked out the eBook and downloaded it to my Nook.

Summary: Australian rare-book expert Hanna Heath receives an outstanding offer: to analyze and conserve the Sarajevo Haggadah when it’s recovered in 1996 during the Bosnian War. The Sarajevo Haggadah is one of the earliest Jewish texts to have illustrations. Quickly, Hanna finds peculiarities about the book – a wing of an insect, wine stains, salt crystals, a white hair, and missing clasps. While Hanna examines this priceless piece of history, the reader goes on a journey in reverse chronological order – making stops in 1940s Sarajevo, 1894 Vienna, 1609 Venice, 1492 Tarragona, and 1480 Seville, visiting the people who physically impacted the Haggadah.

What I Liked : Author Brooks spins and weaves a fascinating saga. These people of the book elicit a broad range of emotions from me. I liked that Hanna seemed to unite everyone in her work with the Haggadah and I appreciated that she spoke directly to the reader whereas the other sections of the story were told in the third person. Hanna did have values and adhered to them even when it hurt her. I pitied her when it came to her relationship with her mother and that she had no clue about her father’s identity. I learned much about Haggadahs and Jewish history in Europe.

What I Disliked : So, Hanna wasn’t the only one telling the story in first person. This was confusing to me and I believe Brooks did this to mislead the reader. Also, some of the characters that I imagine were supposed to be sympathetic were not. When I didn’t care about the characters, the book dragged. Sometimes, the details were gratuitous and Brooks seemed to come across as magnanimous in her “We’re all in this together” theme.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: The Kingston Trio – Where have all the flowers gone? – YouTube

Setting : Australia, Sarajevo, Germany, Vienna, Venice,  Boston, Tarragona Spain, Seville, Jerusalem

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For more on Geraldine Brooks’ People of the Book, check out the following sites:

Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key


Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay | LibraryThing

Rosnay, T. . (2010). Sarah’s key. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin. 9781250004345

Reasons for Reading : I recalled my mom reading this book a few years before the movie hit American theaters. Also, working on my library’s contribution to the Holocaust Museum Houston’s Butterfly Project led me to Sarah’s Key. I checked out the book from HCPL.

Summary: Beginning in Nazi-occupied Paris in 1942, the French police arrest a ten year-old girl and her family in the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup. The girl manages to lock her younger brother in a secret cupboard in the family’s apartment. She promises to return in a few hours.

The girl’s story alternates with that Julia Jarmond, an American journalist living in 2002 Paris with her French husband and daughter. Her editor asks her to write an article commemorating the sixtieth anniversary of the Vel d’Hiv Roundup. As Julia investigates, she stumbles upon a fateful connection to Sarah, that little girl who stowed her brother in the secret cupboard. This link may lead to better living for Julia or the undoing of her marriage.

What I Liked : Author de Rosnay created rich characters in Sarah and Julia. The latter narrated her of the novel and de Rosnay conveyed the thoughts of an American outcast quite authentically. Sarah’s point of view was related in third person.

I adored Jules and Genevieve. These people offer hope for humanity. They’re the sort that deserve Nobel Peace Prizes.

Also, I found it sobering to learn the French police’s involvement in the Holocaust. It just shows how far brainwashing can go.

What I Disliked : This story made me very sad. Obviously, the key issues weren’t the happiest. I promise that I went into reading this book with my eyes open.

The first part of the book alternated between Sarah’s 1942 and Julia’s 2002. Then, the second part of the book didn’t. Without revealing the end, I wasn’t too keen on losing one of those points of view.

Before I forget, Julia’s husband was horrendous!

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song: Linkin Park – In The End – YouTube

Setting : Paris, France, Germany, Poland, New York City, Boston, Italy

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For more on Tatiana de Rosnay’s Sarah’s Key, check out the following sites: