Dads Rock, Too! A Select Listing for Father’s Day @ Jorie’s Store


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Kill_a_Mockingbird_(film)

Theatrical release poster – To Kill a Mockingbird | Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia

As I did for Mother’s Day,  I’m sharing books featuring some of my fathers/father figures in literature. Did your favorite dad make the list?
Again, you can click on the covers, visit Jorie’s Store on Amazon, and shop for some great reading. Making purchases at Jorie’s Store funds future giveaways! 🙂
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Pride and Prejudice  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  A Christmas Carol (Dover Thrift Editions)
A Room with a View  Savvy  To Kill a Mockingbird
Cry, the Beloved Country  Saint Maybe  The Book Thief
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Deborah Johnson’s The Secret of Magic


The Secret of Magic

The Secret of Magic by Deborah Johnson | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 

Title: The Secret of Magic
Author: Deborah Johnson
ISBN: 9780399157721
Length: 416 pages
Publication Date: January 21, 2014
Publisher: Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam
Genre: Historical Fiction
Source: Harris County Public Library

Goodreads

 Reasons for Reading: I either heard about or read something referring to this 2014 release. Given that we were planning a library program about African American History Month, I sought and requested this book via Harris County Public Library (HCPL).

Summary: Decorated African American World War II hero Joe Howard Wilson took the bus home to his native Revere, Mississippi. When expected to give up his seat for German POWs, Joe Howard refused. Later on, Joe Howard’s body is found. Fast forward to the Fall 1946 New York, the reader meets Regina Mary Robichard, a young attorney working for Thurgood Marshall at the NAACP. Regina discovers a letter from writer of the notorious The Secret of Magic, M.P. Calhoun, has called upon the NAACP for help in bringing Joe Howard’s killer to justice. With her childhood copy of The Secret of Magic practically in hand, Regina journeys down to Revere in order to discover what happened to Joe Howard.

One Thing I Learned from this book: Thurgood Marshall’s wife was called “Buster.” To learn more about the late Justice Marshall, click on the following link – Marshall, Thurgood – Facts on File History Database

What I Liked: Regina is an African American woman who was also an attorney. Author Deborah Johnson’s inspiration was Constance Baker Motley. I liked the tidbits about Marshall, too. Johnson’s writing is vivid and rich. Already, I was imagining who should play Regina, M.P. Calhoun, Joe Howard, and Marshall in the movie.

What I Disliked: A few parts dragged for me but this didn’t much eclipse my appreciation of the book.

RR - Yellow  Rainbow Rating: Yellow – Parental Guidance for Kids Under 13

 

Song: Cristine and Kathrine Shipp – Sea Lion Woman

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TBTB (Throwback Thursday Books) – Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird.


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee | LibraryThing

 

I doubt I can go more #tbtb than Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. The first time I read this classic, it was an audiobook. I was probably in elementary school and could easily identify with the narrator, Scout Finch. I read the book again a few years later. I believe it was a version that looked like the cover to the left. It belonged to my dad and it fell apart in my hands. Thus, I bought a newer copy to replace Dad’s old one.

Truman Capote’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Revisited Challenge)


Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories By Truman Capote | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

 
Title and Author(s):  Truman Capote’s
Release Date: 1958

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 978-0679745655
Hours: 160
Source: Harris County Public Library 

* 1001 Books Book

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Reasons for Reading: Initially, I listened to this novella on audiotape. I enjoyed how more than one actor read different parts in the story. However, I considered Elizabeth Ashley of “Evening Shade” fame an odd selection for the voice of Holly Golightly. Nevertheless, I never reviewed this Truman Capote classic. When Breakfast at Tiffany’s won in the Revisited Challenge, I read a printed version.

Summary: An unnamed narrator befriends his enchanting neighbor, Holly Golightly, in the autumn of 1943. Holly insists on referring to the narrator as “Fred” because he reminds her of her older brother. “Fred” and Holly live in apartments in the same brownstone which is located in Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Holly is only a eighteen or nineteen year old girl from the country. Yet, she’s turned into a cosmopolitan darling of cafe society. Holly holds no job and maintains her lifestyle by socializing with wealthy men. These men take her out on the town and shower her with money and expensive gifts. Author Capote called Holly an American geisha.

One Thing I Learned from this book: I saw the film before I read the book. I was surprised that the events of the book took place in 1943-44.

What I Liked: I liked the narrator’s tone throughout the novella. As a reader, I felt his warmth and affection, especially towards Holly Golightly.

What I Disliked: Yet, I wasn’t quite comfortable with this American geisha lifestyle.

RR - Orange  Rainbow Rating: Orange – Restricted from those under age 17 


Song: 
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (3/9) Movie CLIP – Moon River (1961) 

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Sandra Brown’s Rainwater


Rainwater by Sandra Brown | LibraryThing

Brown, S. (2009). Rainwater. New York: Simon & Schuster. 9781439172773

Reasons for Reading : I sought a quick read and noticed a copy of Sandra Brown’s Rainwater setting on the shelf. Seeing the book reminded me that someone had recommended this as something different written by Sandra Brown. So, I checked it out from HCPL.

Summary : An older proprietor of Solly’s, an antiques store out in the middle of Nowhere, Texas receives a visit from well-to-do customers on their way back to Oklahoma. The wife asks the proprietor about the cost of his handsome pocket watch. The proprietor shakes his head and says it’s not for sale. The peculiarity of the name Solly leads the proprietor to tell the story of how the store came to be.

Back in 1934, Ella Barron runs a boardinghouse she inherited from her late parents. She rears her son Solly, a young boy like no other.  Ella works hard and does her best to ignore pitying glances. Things aren’t going well for the town as government slaughters cattle and leaves them for dead in order to drive up prices. Then, the town doctor brings his enigmatic cousin, David Rainwater, to the doorstep of Ella’s boardinghouse. Now, a woman who wishes not for charity has to make room for Rainwater as he is the only one who can work with Solly. Rainwater also turns narrow-minded town bullies on their heads. Ella’s existence of order and chores turns as she comes to life.

What I Liked : I liked the change of pace for Brown. While Brown doesn’t neglect her textured character studies and rich dialogue of her thrillers, Rainwater is not what I’d call a thriller. It’s historical fiction; it’s romantic. Some may call it a gentle read, even. I appreciated the tenderness the author extended to Solly, a child with autism but without a climate to accommodate him. I identified especially with the story line of the cattle slaughter as I had heard about it.

What I Disliked : I only wish Brown would write a few more along these lines. Yes, I enjoy thrill rides but I like leisurely strolls, too.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Song : Sam Cooke – Summer time (w/ Lyrics)

Setting  : Texas

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For more on Sandra Brown’s Rainwater, please click on the following links:

Top Ten Rebels In Literature (characters or authors) | The Broke and the Bookish


Hope everyone had a great holiday! I came home last night, after a relaxing weekend on the beach, to start working on Top Ten Tuesday for today and my computer was acting all wonky..thus I could not get on it to get this ready for today.

So there will be no list from us today but I’m dropping by on my lunch break to put up the Mr. Linky real quick so you all can enjoy each other’s lists!

To see upcoming Top Ten Tuesday’s, please click HERE!

July 5: Top Ten Rebels In Literature (characters or authors) — Those people who stood up for what they believed in despite the cost of doing so.

Authors

  1. Thomas Jefferson, writer of the “Declaration of Independence”
  2. Nikos Kazantzakis, writer of The Last Temptation of Christ
  3. Marjane Satrapi, writer of Persepolis
  4. Betty Friedan, writer of The Feminine Mystique
  5. Rachel Carson, writer of Silent Spring

Characters

  1. The Mirabal sisters of Julia Alvarez’s In the Time of the Butterflies – These real-life heroines stood up for the Dominican Republic and its villainous dictator – Trujillo.
  2. Howard Roark of Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead – Perhaps the most uncompromising rebel, Roark would do things his way only.
  3. Elizabeth McKenna of Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society – Just read the book, you’ll understand what I’m saying.
  4. Atticus Finch of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird – See previous response.
  5. Cinna of Sue Collins’ The Hunger Games – While Katniss is obvious, Cinna was the impetus. Many others have blogged this as well.

Top Ten Book to Movie adaptations | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

 

1) The Virgin Suicides (Jeffrey Eugenides/ Sofia Coppola) – Except for a slight change at the end and leaving out a few characters, Sofia Coppola was faithful to the book. The casting was spot on and the soundtrack was sublime.

2) Sense and Sensibility (Jane Austen/ Ang Lee) – I saw this movie, the one with Emma Thompson in it, before I read the book. The film was so good that I decided to read the book.

3) About a Boy (Nick Hornby/ Chris Weitz) – This movie is one of my all-time favorites. I read the book afterwards and understood, even appreciated the updates on the book. Hornby provided terrific character study and Hugh Grant nailed the role of Will. The boy was good, too.

4) The Graduate (Charles Webb/ Mike Nichols) – I just finished the book. Hoffman, Bancroft, and Ross were superb in the roles. Since I like Simon and Garfunkel, I like The Graduate.

5) Rising Sun (Michael Crichton/ Philip Kaufman) – Wesley Snipes plays a white character and he plays him well. My favorite actor in the cast was Tia Carrerre.

6) The French Lieutenant’s Woman (John Fowles/ Karel Reisz) – The book and the movie were odd. In efforts to provide the contemporary feel of Victorian events, the movie was about both the actors playing Smithson and Sarah in the 1980s.

7) The Rainmaker (John Grisham/ Francis Ford Coppola) – Matt Damon is a great actor, especially when it comes to playing characters out of books. This movie proved it to me. While I was convinced by The Talented Mr. Ripley, this movie adaptation was much better. Also, I liked Rudy Baylor much better than Tom Ripley. Claire Danes was good, too, in The Rainmaker.

8 ) The Godfather (Mario Puzo/ Francis Ford Coppola) – The Coppolas are faring well on my list! The characters are dynamic, Pacino and Keaton were perfectly suited to play Michael and Kay. There were changes in the movies but these received Puzo’s blessing.

9 ) To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee/ Robert Mulligan) – This is requisite.

10) The Green Mile (Stephen King/ Frank Darabont) – I was divided between this one and The Dead Zone. Ultimately, the actors – Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan beat out Christopher Walken.