Top Ten Most Popular Authors on Jorie’s Bookshelf


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

For future Top Ten Tuesday topics & info on how to participate, click here!

top ten authors we own the most books of

(Normally, I prefer borrowing to buying books. Nonetheless, I own books I’ve seen on sale at the Friends of Freeman Bookstore.)

(Thank you, Goodreads, for the images of the following authors.)

1. Julia Alvarez

Julia Álvarez

2. Sandra Brown

Sandra Brown

3. Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton

4. Jeffrey Eugenides

http://www.bookpage.com/the-book-case/2011/02/09/jeffrey-eugenides-and-the-marriage-plot/

5. Katherine Howe

Katherine Howe

6. Stephen King

Stephen King

7. Barbara Kingsolver

Barbara Kingsolver

7. Alan Paton

Alan Paton

8. William Shakespeare

The Chandos portrait of famous writer</p>
<p>http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/britons/briton3.htm

9. Lee Strobel

Lee Strobel

10. Bruce Wilkinson

Bruce Wilkinson

Advertisements

Denise Rinaldo’s Julius Caesar: Dictator (A Wicked History)


Julius Caesar: Dictator for Life (Wicked History) by Denise Rinaldo | LibraryThing

Rinaldo, D. (2010). Julius Caesar: Dictator for life. New York: Franklin Watts. 9780531212769

Reasons for Reading After I finished the Cleopatra biography, I wanted to know a little more about Julius Caesar. Yet, I didn’t want to read a 400 page book about him. That’s when I remembered the Wicked History Series. I checked out a copy from HCPL.

Summary Back in 100 BC, Rome existed as a democratic republic. Some consider this one of first democracies. Yet, Rome faced trouble – slave revolts, corrupt politicians, military coups, etc.

Rising from the Roman ashes, Julius Caesar eases the chaos. He ruthlessly attacked all who opposed him; including old allies. After winning the civil war, Caesar declared himself supreme ruler. The Republic ended with him. Not everyone liked that.

What I Liked This series of books delivers the facts in a concise, informative way. I appreciated learning the facts of Julius Caesar and his world without being bogged down in too many details.

What I Disliked Just one thing – I wished for more on Cleopatra.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Quote:

We should all be

very afraid. He is surely

making himself into a tyrant.

– Roman orator Cicero, on Caesar, 59 B.C.

Song: Tears For Fears – “Everybody Wants To Rule The World” – ORIGINAL VIDEO – YouTube

Setting: Ancient Rome, the Near East, Europe

You might also like:

For more about Julius Caesar, please check out the following sites:

Top Ten Tuesday: Jorie’s Top Ten Authors She’d Love to Meet


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This feature was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists! Each week we will post a new Top Ten list  that one of our bloggers here at The Broke and the Bookish will answer. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND add your name to the Linky widget so that everyone can check out other bloggers lists.

Click here to see the upcoming topics!

July 12: Top Ten Authors I Would DIE to meet (living or dead)

1. Elie Wiesel – He’s a survivor and a writer. Additionally, Wiesel tops my list as a person I admire.

2. Thomas Jefferson – He’s my favorite founding father and his genius continues to enthrall.

3. Rachel Carson – She related science in such a way that an artsy-fartsy type such as myself could actually “get it.”  

4. Sarah Dessen – If meeting her is anything like reading her books, then I’m there!  

5. Jeffrey Eugenides – After reading Middlesex for the second time, I have twice as many questions. I hope he has answers.

6. William Shakespeare – Wow, I don’t know where I’d begin with my questions for him.  

7. Sarah Addison Allen – I’ve read three of her books already and I like the enchanted world she has conjured.

8. Jane Addams – Another one who inspires me, Addams wrote pamphlets to support Hull House.

9. Mark Twain – Do I need to say anything else?

10. Isabel Allende – I like her books and I’d like to meet her.

Stephen Greenblatt’s Will in the World . . .


Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare by Stephen Greenblatt | LibraryThing

Greenblatt, S., & Fernandez, P. J. (2004). Will in the world: How Shakespeare became Shakespeare. Prince Frederick, Md: Recorded Books. 9781419307607

I needed another audiobook. I also wanted non-fiction as I’m participating in the

2011 Non-Fiction Challenge

. When I saw a biography of Shakespeare, I was pleased. My love of the Bard has led me to take an elective on some of his plays and to the Folger Shakespeare Library.
Harvard professor Stephen Greenblatt discovers and fleshes out William Shakespeare by delving into Shakespeare’s works. Through his plays, Greenblatt sees a precocious son of a glover and a gifted wordsmith. By this method, the author argues that Shakespeare really wrote his own stuff.

My only complaint here is that since I’ve not read all of Shakespeare’s works, I didn’t recognize all the references or each nuance which supported Greenblatt’s argument. Nevertheless, I could see Shakespeare’s love for his daughter Susanna in plays such as King Lear and The Tempest. Also, I still marvel at the Bard’s genius in Hamlet and Othello.

Four Out of Five Pearls

Places: Merry Old England

 
You might also like:

 For more on Stephen Greenblatt’s Will in the World…, check out the following:

Top Ten Favorite Love Stories In Books | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday | The Broke and the Bookish

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers’ answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

NEXT WEEK THE TOPIC IS: Top Ten Book to Movie adaptations (for those movies that actually didn’t butcher the book!) See a list of future TTT here.

However, this week’s challenge is Top Ten Favorite Love Stories in Books. So, here goes . . .

  1. Tristan by Gottfried von Strassburg: The honorable Cornish knight Tristan follows orders of his uncle, King Mark, to escort his uncle’s comely bride, the Princess Isolde. Isolde possesses a magic love potion which she and her betrothed are to share. However, Isolde and Tristan have the drink.
  2. Katherine by Anya Seton: This historical fiction novel features the story of the remarkable Katherine Swynford. This real person caught the attention of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. While they didn’t marry until close to the end of their lives, this story resonates to this days.
  3. Othello by William Shakespeare: I made myself only select one Shakespeare play. Othello the Moor marries the fair Desdemona. Desdemona chooses Othello over the foppish men of Venetian childhood and loves Othello eternally. However, the evil Iago turns Othello into the green-eyed monster.
  4. “Sonnets from the Portuguese” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning: the sickly and hermetic Elizabeth believes herself to be dying. However, her fortune takes a turn for the better with the young, dashing Robert Browning.
  5. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough: It’s a little seamy but still deserves mention. Meggie falls in love with Ralph de Briccasart, the Roman Catholic priest.
  6. The Divine Comedy by Dante: Forget Francesca and Paola, I’m talking about Dante the Pilgrim and his ladylove, Beatrice. He admired her so much that in his writing, Beatrice guides him through Heaven.
  7. Atonement by Ian McEwan: Dilettante Cecilia Tallis and overachieving Robbie Turner unite in a pivotal way, changing the two permanently. When Robbie loses favor, Cecelia remains at his side.
  8. Beauty and the Beast by  Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve:  This story strikes similar chords to that of King Lear. The youngest daughter, Belle, is the truest beauty. She stays at the Beast’s Castle to make up for what her father did. When she sees this brute suffering, she cries over him.
  9. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand: Even though I absolutely abhor the sexual violence (rape even) and Rand’s masogyny, this is a remarkable story of love.  Roark and Dominique bring out the best in one another and have a happier end than most.
  10. The Stephanie Plum Series by Janet Evanovich: This is probably my favorite love triangle in literature. Stephanie Plum’s attention is coveted by Joe Moretti and Ranger. These days, I root for Ranger.

Top Ten Inspirational Characters | Top Ten Tuesday


 

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

 
 
THE TOPIC FOR NEXT WEEK IS:  Top Ten Books I Wished I Read as a Kid. Check out future TTT topics.

 
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

This week, The Broke and the Bookish challenged readers to choose their Top Ten Inspirational Characters. Since the term “characters” is used, I’m only listing made up or fictionalized characters. Spoiler Alerts!

1. Atticus Finch of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee – Atticus Finch is an attorney in Depression-Era Alabama. When black man Tom Robinson is accused of raping Mayella Ewell, Finch represents Robinson. It’s apparent that Robinson has been falsely accused but Finch’s case is hard to prove thanks to the bigotry of the day. Nevertheless, Finch does not back down from defending his client.

2. Antonia Shimerda of My Antonia by Willa Cather – This beauty of Bohemia immigrates with her family and settles in Nebraska. She both works and plays hard. Nothing tanks Antonia.

3. James Jarvis of Cry, The Beloved Country by Alan Paton – James Jarvis is a wealthy South African landowner. His son, Arthur, was an engineer and an activist for racial justice. James learns of his son’s death at the hands of black thieves. Yet, James picks up where Arthur left off in his cause for the end of Apartheid.

4. Patria Mirabal of In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez – The Mirabal family lives in The Dominican Republic under the rule of Trujillo. The Mirabals have four daughters: Patria, Dede, Minerva, and Maria Teresa. The oldest of the Mirabal sisters, Patria is very religious. She and her husband, Pedrito, have a very solid marriage and family life. Patria is also a revolutionary, starting a Christian revolutionary group and merging it with her sister Minerva’s revolutionary group. Ultimately, she loses everything for the cause of her country.

5. Sydney Carton of A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens – Mr. Carton is a young English barrister that doesn’t live up to his potential. He falls in love with the pure, golden, French Lucie Manette.  This is unrequited, though, because Lucie’s heart belongs to her husband, Charles Darney, also Carton’s doppelganger. D Darney once was a French aristocrat but, on the brink of Revolution, is about to be executed. However, Carton steps in for Darney, saying “It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”

6. Sergeant McShane of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith – Michael McShane is a policeman turned politician. He is married to a sickly woman but admires widow Katie Rommely Nolan, protagonist Francie’s mother, from afar. McShane remains faithful to his wife until her death does them part. Then, he proposes to Katie. Katie accepts. McShane takes care of not only Katie but her three children by her late husband.

7. Cordelia of King Lear by William Shakespeare – Cordelia is the youngest daughter of King Lear. When her awful sisters, Goneril and Regan, shamelessly flatter their father so they can inherit part of his estate, Cordelia doesn’t play. For this reason, King Lear disowns his virtuous daughter.

8. Jane Eyre of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë – Jane survives a childhood of depravity with her character in tact. She perseveres through the ups and downs of a relationship with Mr. Rochester. Jane also refuses to marry for any other reason than love.

9. Claudius of I, Claudius and Claudius the God by Robert Graves– In these two books, Claudius relates the story of his life. He started out as a lame child, mostly ignored for this reason. After the death of Caligua, Claudius is crowned emperor. The sheer survival of Claudius alone inspires.

10. Delia and James “Jim” Dillingham Young of “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry – Here’s a man willing to sacrifice for the happiness of his wife. Also, we’ve got a woman willing to sacrifice for the happiness of her husband. Don’t I just love irony?

11. Jesus Christ

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!