Seeing the Story – Life of Pi


Life of Pi | Jorie’s Store @ Amazon

Lee, A. (Director), Sharma, S. (Performer), Khan, I., & Hussain, A. (2012). Life of pi [Theater].

Reasons for Watching: I read Yann Martel’s Life of Pi a few years ago. I originally listened to the audiobook via HCPL and bought a copy of a paperback copy from the Freeman Bookstore.

Summary : Born Piscine Molitar Patel in idyllic Pondicherry, India takes on the nickname of Pi in order to avoid being called “Pissing Patel.”  Pi is the precocious son of a zoo keeper and becomes a Hindu, Christian, and Muslim simultaneously. As tensions grow in 1977, the Patels decide to immigrate to Canada via a Japanese freight boat. When the freighter wrecks, Pi finds himself in the middle of the Pacific on a 26-foot lifeboat with a zebra, a hyena, an orangutan and a 450-pound Bengal tiger named Richard Parker, all fighting for survival.

Book to Movie Adaptation : In the book, a few passages are narrated by an “author.” Mostly, the story was told by Pi himself. Early on, director Ang Lee lets viewers listen along with the author as Pi relates his story. For the sake of time, many things were condensed. While still living in India, Pi is old enough in the movie to have a love interest in the movie. Also, Pi’s mother , Gita (played by Tabu) was much less religious in the book. As a number of differences are spoiler-laden, I’ll refer the curious readers to 9 Big Differences Between The Life Of Pi Movie And Book.

Review :

Four Out of Five Pearls 

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Top Ten Books I Wish I’d Read as a Kid | Top Ten Tuesday


Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!
Each week we will post a new Top Ten list complete with one of our bloggers answers. Everyone is welcome to join. All we ask is that you link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your own Top Ten Tuesday post AND post a comment on our post with a link to your Top Ten Tuesday post to share with us and all those who are participating. If you don’t have a blog, just post your answers as a comment. If you can’t come up with ten, don’t worry about it—post as many as you can!

THE TOPIC FOR NEXT WEEK IS: Top Ten Best Debut Books (of any year..just your favorite debut books. If you want, you can focus on debuts of 2011 but I’d like to include any debut books for those who read older works). Check out future TTT topics.
  1. A Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter – My mom read and liked this book when she was a kid. For whatever reason, I was too busy reading The Babysitter’s Club.
  2. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry – I didn’t read this one until I was twenty-four. Nevertheless, I was taken in by the artistry of not only the illustrations but the phrases.
  3. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle – Several of my friends read this book as kids but I still have yet to read it. My TBR list is growing.
  4. Profiles in Courage by John F. Kennedy – As enthusiastic as I was about biographies, I somehow missed this one.
  5. Animals Should Definitely Not Wear Clothing by Judi & Ron Barrett – I didn’t discover this gem until I was an adult.  One of my coworkers read this to preschoolers and I was laughing right along with them.
  6. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll – I read this one a few months ago. As a child, I found the Disney feature nightmarish. Perhaps I could’ve overcome my fears if I’d actually read the book then. It’s not my favorite book ever but it is still pervasive.
  7. The Lorax by Dr. Seuss – Okay, I made the mistake of reading this to giddy preschoolers when I was twenty-six years old. If I’d read it as a child, I would’ve known better.
  8. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain –  Well, I enjoyed The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It’s likely I could’ve liked Tom Sawyer, too. Also, one of my favorite characters on “Lost”, Sawyer a.k.a. James Ford, was modeled after Tom Sawyer.
  9. Life of Pi by Yann Martel – This book wasn’t around when I was a kid but I liked it as an adult. The messages carried by Pi and Richard Parker show what God creatures can do.
  10. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas – I loved the Disney movie with Chris O’Donnell, Charlie Sheen, Kiefer Sutherland, and Oliver Platt. It’s a wonder I never read the book — until I consider that it’s the size of Luxembourg.

The Infinite Possibility of Life of Pi


 

Life of Pi by Yann Martel | LibraryThing

* 1001 Books Book

Martel, Y., & Woodman, J. (2002). Life of pi a novel. Minneapolis, MN: HighBridge. 9781565117792

I remember when Good Morning America announced it’s next book club read was Life of Pi by Yann Martel. Life of Pi is a novel in three parts with one hundred chapters Since then, I have seen Life of Pi repeatedly listed among my friends’ favorite books. I decided I wanted to find out what all the fuss was about and I was in for a treat. I checked out the audiobook version of Life of Pi (it’s citation is provided above) and enjoyed it immensely.

Part One begins with a wandering author in search of a story. While in Pondicherry, the capital of what was French India, the unnamed writer meets the elderly Francis Adirubasamy. Adirubasamy mentions the great story of Pi Patel. This is one that “will make you believe in God.” The author says that only Pi can tell this story. On the audio, there are two voices: the one of the author and that of Pi.

We first meet Piscene “Pi” Molitor Patel as a middle-aged man living with his family in Canada. He double-majored in Religion and Zoology. He voices the question that this is such an odd pairing. From there, the audience discovers that Pi was the son of a weary zoo keeper and a follower of Hinduism, Christianity, and Islam. His affinity for both animals and loving God is expressed fervently by Pi. He’s also quite witty; forming the nickname of Pi so he deals less with classmates destroying his given name. All of this is in the midst of the Indian period called “The Emergency.” Due to political instability experienced in 1977 India, Pi’s father makes the hard decision to sell the zoo and its animals and immigrate with his family to Canada.

So, the Patels and numerous animals who once resided at the Pondicherry Zoo, sail upon a Japanese cargo ship to Canada. Part Two presents the sinking ship. Jumping into the water, Pi pulls himself into a lifeboat. Soon, he finds himself on board with a zebra, a hyena, an orangutan called Orange Juice, and Richard Parker, a Bengal tiger. As the back cover mentions, it takes Pi’s knowledge of animals and his faith to survive. When he does, can anyone really believe that he managed within such a menagerie?

I have learned much from this book. I learned all kinds of things about animals such as tigers can make a sound referred to as  “prusten” which means no harm. Another thing I found within Pi’s ordeal was that it would take a Kierkegaardian leap of faith not only to survive but to believe.  Allegorical or not,  Life of Pi is now one of my favorite books, too.

Places: India, Pacific Ocean, Mexico, Canada

4  1/2 Pearls.